Abigail

1720–24 January 1776 (Age 56)
of,,Middlesex,Massachusetts

The Life of Abigail

Abigail was born in 1720. She married Abijah Learned in 1745, in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. They were the parents of at least 2 sons and 1 daughter. She died on 24 January 1776, at the age of 56, and was buried in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

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Family Time Line

Abijah Learned
1715–1783
Abigail
1720–1776
Marriage: 1745
Abigail Learnard
1747–1830
Isaac Learned
1751–1827
Nathaniel Learned
1753–

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
1745
Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
children

(3)

World Events (2)

1776

Age 56

Thomas Jefferson's American Declaration of Independence endorsed by Congress. Colonies declare independence.
1776 · The Declaration to the King

Age 56

"""At the end of the Second Continental Congress the 13 colonies came together to petition independence from King George III. With no opposing votes, the Declaration of Independence was drafted and ready for all delegates to sign on the Fourth of July 1776. While many think the Declaration was to tell the King that they were becoming independent, its true purpose was to be a formal explanation of why the Congress voted together to declare their independence from Britain. The Declaration also is home to one of the best-known sentences in the English language, stating, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."""""""

Name Meaning

Biblical name, meaning ‘father of exaltation’ in Hebrew, borne by one of King David's wives, who had earlier been married to Nabal (1 Samuel 25:3), and by the mother of Absalom's captain Amasa (2 Samuel 1:25). The name first came into general use in Britain in the 16th century, under Puritan influence. It was a common name in literature for a lady's maid, for example in Beaumont and Fletcher's play The Scornful Lady ( 1616 ). The biblical Abigail refers to herself as ‘thy servant’ in addressing King David. In Ireland this name has traditionally been used as an Anglicized form of Gobnat , although the reasons for this are not clear. It was popular in the 17th century, especially among Puritans and Nonconformists, and has again enjoyed considerable favour since the 1990s.

Dictionary of First Names © Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges 1990, 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (2)

  • Abigail Learned, "Find A Grave Index"
  • LEARNED, "Find A Grave Index"

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