Irma Pearl Smith

27 December 1919–6 February 2011 (Age 91)
Hymer, Chase, Kansas, United States

The Life of Irma Pearl

When Irma Pearl Smith was born on 27 December 1919, in Hymer, Chase, Kansas, United States, her father, George Oda Smith, was 41 and her mother, Della Mae Hamilton, was 35. She lived in Elmdale, Chase, Kansas, United States in 1930 and Rural, Chase, Kansas, United States in 1935. She died on 6 February 2011, in Cottonwood Falls, Chase, Kansas, United States, at the age of 91, and was buried in Strong Township Cemetery, Strong City, Chase, Kansas, United States.

Photos & Memories (2)

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Family Time Line

Samuel Frederick Roberts
1919–2008
Irma Pearl Smith
1919–2011

Spouse and Children

    Samuel Frederick Roberts

    Male1919–2008Male

    Female1919–2011Female

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(7)

+2 More Children

World Events (8)

1920

Age 1

The Prohibition Era. Sale and manufacture of alcoholic liquors outlawed. A mushrooming of illegal drinking joints, home-produced alcohol and gangsterism.
1927 · Kansas Adopts a Flag

Age 8

The flag of the State of Kansas was adopted on September 24, 1927. The flag was designed by Hazel Avery in 1925.
1944 · The G.I Bill

Age 25

The G.I. Bill was a law that provided a range of benefits for returning World War II veterans that were on active duty during the war and weren't dishonorably discharged. The goal was to provide rewards for all World War II veterans. The act avoided life insurance policy payouts because of political distress caused after the end of World War I. But the Benefits that were included were: Dedicated payments of tuition and living expenses to attend high school, college or vocational/technical school, low-cost mortgages, low-interest loans to start a business, as well as one year of unemployment compensation. By the mid-1950s, around 7.8 million veterans used the G.I. Bill education benefits.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a worker in metal, from Middle English smith (Old English smið, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Metalworking was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents were perhaps the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is the most frequent of all American surnames; it has also absorbed, by assimilation and translation, cognates and equivalents from many other languages (for forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 ).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Erma Roberts in household of Sam F Roberts, "United States Census, 1940"
  • Erma P Smith in household of George O Smith, "Kansas State Census, 1925"
  • Irma P Smith in household of Oda Smith, "United States Census, 1920"

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