Elizabeth Knott

Brief Life History of Elizabeth

When Elizabeth Knott was born on 29 September 1860, in Virginia, United States, her father, Richard Francis Knott, was 45 and her mother, Charity H. Prince, was 30. She died on 17 January 1939, in Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, United States, at the age of 78, and was buried in Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, United States.

Photos and Memories (1)

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Family Time Line

Richard Francis Knott
1814–1873
Charity H. Prince
1829–1894
Elizabeth Knott
1860–1939
Richard Francis Knott
1863–1922
Arabella Hays Knott
1865–1958
Willie Knott
1869–1959
John Prince Knott
1870–1934

Sources (9)

  • Elizbeth Knott, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Elizabeth Knott, "Alabama Deaths, 1908-1974"
  • Elizabeth Knott, "Alabama, Friends of Magnolia Cemetery, Funeral Books, 1911-1965"

World Events (8)

1861 · The Battle of Manassas

The Battle of Manassas is also referred to as the First Battle of Bull Run. 35,000 Union troops were headed towards Washington D.C. after 20,000 Confederate forces. The McDowell's Union troops fought with General Beauregard's Confederate troops along a little river called Bull Run. 

1863

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

1881 · The Assassination of James Garfield

Garfield was shot twice by Charles J. Guitea at Railroad Station in Washington, D.C. on July 2, 1881. After eleven weeks of intensive and other care Garfield died in Elberon, New Jersey, the second of four presidents to be assassinated, following Abraham Lincoln.

Name Meaning

English: from the Middle English personal name Knotte, from knotte ‘knot’, related to, possibly confused with, but not historically identical with Cnut (Old Norse Knútr, Knut, originally a nickname from Old Norse knútr ‘knot’), found Latinized as Canutus.

German: variant of Knoth .

English: nickname, perhaps for a short, thick-set person, or for a person with a prominent tumour, wart, or boil, from a transferred use of Middle English knot(te) ‘hard or firm mass, such as that formed by a knot tied in a string’.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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