María Presentación Arizpe Agüero

13 November 1918–4 January 2010 (Age 91)
Santa Mónica, Guerrero, Coahuila, Mexico

The Life of María Presentación

When María Presentación Arizpe Agüero was born on 13 November 1918, in Santa Mónica, Guerrero, Coahuila, Mexico, her father, Concepción Arizpe Villareal, was 48 and her mother, Petra Agüero Sánchez, was 20. She married Víctor Durán Hernández on 13 October 1938, in Villa Unión, Coahuila, Mexico. They were the parents of at least 3 sons. She lived in Marion, Guadalupe, Texas, United States in 1920. She died on 4 January 2010, in Eagle Pass, Maverick, Texas, United States, at the age of 91.

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Family Time Line

Víctor Durán Hernández
1913–1990
María Presentación Arizpe Agüero
1918–2010
Marriage: 13 October 1938
Santiago Durán Arizpe
1939–1939
Amaro Durán Arizpe
1943–1943
Adalberto Durán Arizpe
1944–2008

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
13 October 1938
Villa Unión, Coahuila, Mexico
children

(3)

    Santiago Durán Arizpe

    Male1939–1939Male

    Amaro Durán Arizpe

    Male1943–1943Male

    Male1944–2008Male

Parents and Siblings

    Concepción Arizpe Villareal

    Male1869–1939Male

    Petra Agüero Sánchez

    Female1898–Female

siblings

(3)

World Events (8)

1919 · The Eighteenth Amendment

Age 1

The Eighteenth Amendment established a prohibition on all intoxicating liquors in the United States. As a result of the Amendment, the Prohibition made way for bootlegging and speakeasies becoming popular in many areas. The Eighteenth Amendment was then repealed by the Twenty-first Amendment. Making it the first and only amendment that has been repealed.
1920

Age 2

Obregón rebels. Carranza dies. Obregón elected president.
1942 · The Japanese American internment

Age 24

Caused by the tensions between the United States and the Empire of Japan, the internment of Japanese Americans caused many to be forced out of their homes and forcibly relocated into concentration camps in the western states. More than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forced into these camps in fear that some of them were spies for Japan.

Name Meaning

Castilianized form of Basque Aritzpe, a topographic name from Basque (h)aritz ‘oak’ + -be ‘below’, ‘under’.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Presentison Arispe in household of Concepcion Arispe, "United States Census, 1920"
  • Presentación Arizpe, "Mexico, Coahuila, Civil Registration, 1861-1998"
  • Maria Arizpe in entry for Amaro Durán, "Mexico, Coahuila, Civil Registration, 1861-1998"

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