Joanna Ross

20 December 1830–1 January 1916 (Age 85)
Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire, Scotland, United Kingdom

The Life Summary of Joanna

When Joanna Ross was born on 20 December 1830, in Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire, Scotland, United Kingdom, her father, Daniel Ross, was 40 and her mother, Agnes McKellar, was 40. She married John McLaws on 5 December 1850, in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States. They were the parents of at least 7 sons and 6 daughters. She lived in Dunbartonshire, Scotland in 1841 and Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States in 1860. She died on 1 January 1916, in Tooele, Tooele, Utah, United States, at the age of 85, and was buried in Tooele, Tooele, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (37)

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Family Time Line

John McLaws
1827–1922
Joanna Ross
1830–1916
Marriage: 5 December 1850
John McLaws Jr
1852–1935
Daniel Ross McLaws
1854–1935
William McLaws
1856–1929
George McLaws
1858–1948
Robert Fleming McLaws
1860–1943
Agnes Rose McLaws
1861–1903
Alexander Ross McLaws
1864–1953
Sarah Whitworth McLaws
1866–1866
Jane McLaws
1867–1940
Catherine McLaws
1869–1933
Joanna McLaws
1871–1874
James McLaws
1874–1874
Mary Ann McLaws
1874–1965

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    5 December 1850Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States
  • Children

    (13)

    +8 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings

    (11)

    +6 More Children

    World Events (8)

    1832 · The Black Hawk War
    Age 2
    Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.
    1832 · The Scottish Reform Act
    Age 2
    The Scottish Reform Act was introduced by Parliament that introduced changes to the election laws in Scotland. The Act didn’t change the method of how the counties elected members but adopted a different solution for each pair of counties. Ultimately, it brought about boundary changes so that some burghs would have more say for the country than others.
    1854 · Great North of Scotland Railway
    Age 24
    Being one of the two smallest railways in 1923, the Great North of Scotland Railway carried its first passengers from Kittybrewster to Huntly in 1854. In the 1880s the railways were refurbished to give express services to the suburban parts in Aberdeen. There were junctions with the Highland Railway established to help connect Aberdeenshire, Banffshire and Moray counties. The railway started to deliver goods from the North Sean and from the whisky distilleries in Speyside. With the implementation of bus services and the purchase of the British Railway the Great North of Scotland Railway was discontinued.

    Name Meaning

    Scottish: habitational name from one or other of a number of Scottish and English places called Ross or Roos(e), especially Roose (Lancashire) and Roos (East Yorkshire). The placenames derive from a British ancestor of Welsh rhos ‘moor, heath, plain’, which is the sense of the cognate Gaelic word ros. The Scottish surname has at least three origins. First, the Anglo-Norman family from Roos (East Yorkshire) was introduced to Scotland when Robert of Roos, lord of Wark Castle (Northumberland), married Isabella, an illegitimate daughter of King William the Lion. Second, various families took the name from the province of Ross in northern Scotland and other places of that name. Third, there were Norman families in Scotland by the 13th century who probably derived their name from Rots in Normandy (see 2 below). The descendants of Godfrey de Ros, tenant of the de Morville lords of Cunninghame, were major landholders in Ayrshire, and almost certainly took their name from Rots. The Rose family of Kilravock (Nairnshire) may take their name from either of these three (see Rose ). The lairds of Balnagown adopted the surname Ross after the earldom of Ross (to which they considered themselves rightful heirs) had passed into other hands through the female line.English (of Norman origin): habitational name from Rots in Calvados (France), probably named with the ancient Germanic element rod ‘clearing’ (compare Rhodes ). This was the original home of a family de Ros, who were established in Kent in 1130 and had major estates in Kent until well into the 13th century.English: habitational name from Wrose, in Shipley, near Bradford (Yorkshire), with re-spelling of Wr- as R- due to the loss of /w/ before /r/ in early modern English pronunciation. The spelling Wrose is no longer current. The placename derives from Old English wrāse ‘knot, something twisted’, referring to the steep-sided hill on which the settlement stands, with the sense ‘broken or twisting hill’.

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Ruskin
    Ros
    Rose
    Rossell
    Rusling
    Rohs
    Rosse

    Story Highlight

    Joanna Ross McLaws

    A Sketch of my Mother Joanna Ross McLaws By Mary Ann Shields My mother was born in Helenburg, Dunbarton, Scotland, 23 Dec. 1831. She was the daughter of Daniel Ross and Agnes McKeller. She was b …

    Sources (69)

    • Joanna Ross McLaws in household of John McLaws, "Utah, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Church Census Records, 1914-1960"
    • Joan Ross in entry for Mary Ann McLaws Shields, "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1965"
    • Johannah Mc Laws in household of John C Mc Laws, "United States Census, 1860"

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