Ruby Fern Edwards

Brief Life History of Ruby Fern

When Ruby Fern Edwards was born on 23 September 1918, in Hoffman, Okmulgee, Oklahoma, United States, her father, Ralph R Edwards, was 25 and her mother, Ima Lessie Willhite, was 19. She had at least 1 son and 1 daughter with Dale Boyd Henderson. She lived in Bryan Township, Okmulgee, Oklahoma, United States in 1930 and Muskogee, Muskogee, Oklahoma, United States in 1950. She died on 9 March 1985, in Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States, at the age of 66, and was buried in East Lawn Memorial Park, Sacramento, Sacramento, California, United States.

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Family Time Line

Dale Boyd Henderson
1914–
Ruby Fern Edwards
1918–1985
Beuna Gail Henderson
1935–1941
Donald Boyd Henderson
1939–1994

Sources (6)

  • Ruby Henderson, "United States 1950 Census"
  • Ruby Henderson, "Oklahoma, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945"
  • Ruby Fern Edwards Henderson, "Find A Grave Index"

World Events (8)

1919 · The Eighteenth Amendment

The Eighteenth Amendment established a prohibition on all intoxicating liquors in the United States. As a result of the Amendment, the Prohibition made way for bootlegging and speakeasies becoming popular in many areas. The Eighteenth Amendment was then repealed by the Twenty-first Amendment. Making it the first and only amendment that has been repealed.

1921 · Tulsa Race Massacre

 By 1921, Tulsa was a booming city with a population of over one hundred thousand, with ten thousand African Americans in the Greenwood District. Crime rates in Tulsa soared and vigilantism was present. An incident occurred with Dick Rowland, an African American shoe shiner, and Sara Page, a white elevator operator. Reports claim Rowland stepped on Page’s foot and she let out a scream. The newspaper reported Rowland attempted to rape Page. Rowland was arrested and white vigilantes demanded the sheriff to hand over Rowland for lynching. An armed group of African American men went to the courthouse to aid in protecting Rowland from the mob. The group was turned away and a shot was fired between the white and African American groups, which ignited a riot. While buildings in Tulsa were burned, a major effort by whites focused mainly on the Greenwood District which was burned to the ground and many were shot. Over 30 people were killed and many were injured in the riots. 

1937 · The Neutrality Act

The Neutrality Acts were passed in response to the growing conflicts in Europe and Asia during the time leading up to World War II. The primary purpose was so the US wouldn't engage in any more foreign conflicts. Most of the Acts were repealed in 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.

Name Meaning

English and Welsh: variant of Edward , with genitival or post-medieval excrescent -s. This surname is also very common among African Americans.

History: One of the earliest American bearers of this very common English surname was William Edwards, the son of Rev. Richard Edwards, a London clergyman in the age of Elizabeth I, who came to New England c. 1640. His descendant Jonathan (1703–58), of East Windsor, CT, was a prominent Congregational clergyman whose New England theology led to the first Great Awakening, a great religious revival.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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