Armenius Miller

3 March 1835–16 July 1904 (Age 69)
Vermilion, Stratton Township, Edgar, Illinois, United States

The Life Summary of Armenius

When Armenius Miller was born on 3 March 1835, in Vermilion, Stratton Township, Edgar, Illinois, United States, his father, Armenius Miller, was 35 and his mother, Nancy Lewman, was 22. He married Cornelia Eliza Clawson on 21 March 1863, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 2 daughters. He lived in Davis, Utah, United States for about 20 years and Big Horn, Sheridan, Wyoming, United States in 1900. He died on 16 July 1904, in Sheridan, Sheridan, Wyoming, United States, at the age of 69, and was buried in Sheridan, Sheridan, Wyoming, United States.

Photos and Memories (3)

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Family Time Line

Armenius Miller
1835–1904
Sarah Amanda Kerr
1856–1926
Marriage: 26 July 1886
Silas Miller
1869–1931
Mary Marie Miller
1888–1950
William Albert Miller
1890–1961
Armenus Miller
1892–1894
Martha M Miller
1895–1981
Rhoda Miller
1898–1987

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    26 July 1886Johnson, Wyoming, United States
  • Children

    (6)

    +1 More Child

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings

    (2)

    World Events (8)

    1839 · From Swamp to Beautiful Place
    Age 4
    By 1829 Venus, Illinois had grown sufficiently and in 1832 was one of the contenders for the new county seat. However, the honor was awarded to a nearby city, Carthage. In 1834 the name Venus was changed to Commerce because the settlers felt that the new name better suited their plans. But during late 1839, arriving members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints bought the small town of Commerce and in April 1840 it was renamed Nauvoo by Joseph Smith Jr., who led the Latter-Day Saints to Nauvoo to escape persecution in Missouri. The name Nauvoo is derived from the traditional Hebrew language. It is notable that by 1844 Nauvoo's population had swollen to around 12,000 residents, rivaling the size of Chicago at the time. After the Latter-Day Saints left the population settled down toward 2,000 people.
    1850
    Age 15
    Named after the early pioneer leader Daniel C. Davis the County was established as a territory in 1850.The territorial legislature created Davis County in 1852 and designated its County seat at Farmington-midway between boundaries-the Weber River on the north and the mouth of the Jordan River on the south. Westward the County includes a portion of the Great Salt Lake-its largest island on which Antelope Island State Park is now located.During first half-century Davis County grew slowly.It supported a hardy pioneer people engaged in irrigation agriculture and raising livestock.The Utah Central Railroad(now the Union Pacific crossed the County from Ogden on the north to Salt Lake City on the south in 1870 and offered welcome transportation links to bring manufactured products.This was the beginning of a transition in the County's history that led to mechanized agriculture, a surge of commerce, banking, and local business along with improved roads, new water systems, and the electrification of homes and business
    1856 · The Largest Map Company in the World
    Age 21
    William Rand opened a small printing shop in Chicago. Doing most of the work himself for the first two years he decided to hire some help. Rand Hired Andrew McNally, an Irish Immigrant, to work in his shop. After doing business with the Chicago Tribune, Rand and McNally were hired to run the Tribune's entire printing operation. Years later, Rand and McNally established Rand McNally & Co after purchasing the Tribune's printing business. They focused mainly on printing tickets, complete railroad guides and timetables for the booming railroad industry around the city. What made the company successful was the detailed maps of roadways, along with directions to certain places. Rand McNally was the first major map publisher to embrace a system of numbered highways and erected many of the roadside highway signs that have been adopted by state and federal highway authorities. The company is still making and updating the world maps that are looked at every day.

    Name Meaning

    English and Scottish: occupational name for a miller. The standard modern vocabulary word represents the northern Middle English term miller, an agent derivative of mille ‘mill’, reinforced by Old Norse mylnari (see Milner ). In southern, western, and central England Millward (literally, ‘mill keeper’) was the usual term. In North America, the surname Miller has absorbed many cognate surnames from other languages, for example German Müller (see Mueller ), Dutch Mulder and Molenaar , French Meunier , Italian Molinaro , Spanish Molinero , Hungarian Molnár (see Molnar ), Slovenian, Croatian, and Serbian Mlinar , Polish Młynarz or Młynarczyk (see Mlynarczyk ). Miller (including in the senses below) is the seventh most frequent surname in the US.South German, Swiss German, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Müller ‘miller’ (see Mueller ) and, in North America, also an altered form of this. This form of the surname is also found in other European countries, notably in Poland, Denmark, France (mainly Alsace and Lorraine), and Czechia; compare 3 below.Americanized form of Polish, Czech, Croatian, Serbian, and Slovenian Miler ‘miller’, a surname of German origin.

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Millar
    Mueller
    Milner
    Millward
    McMiller

    Sources (18)

    • E Miller, "United States Census, 1870"
    • Armenius Miller in entry for John T. Barnes and Rhoda Littleton, "Montana, County Marriages, 1865-1950"
    • Armenius Miller in entry for Mary Marie Nelson, "Washington Deaths and Burials, 1810-1960"

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