John Alexander

1777–1860 (Age 83)
Washington, Arkansas, United States

The Life of John

When John Alexander was born on 27 January 1777, in Washington, Arkansas, United States, his father, David Alexander, was 38 and his mother, Martha Wilson, was 22. He married Jane Stevenson on 11 January 1798, in South Carolina, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 9 daughters. He lived in Arkansas, United States in 1870. He died on 27 May 1860, in Washington, Arkansas, United States, at the age of 83, and was buried in Black Oak Cemetery, Greenland, Washington, Arkansas, United States.

Photos & Memories (4)

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Family Time Line

John Alexander
1777–1860
Jane Stevenson
1779–1873
Marriage: 11 January 1798
Sarah M Alexander
1798–1863
Abigail Alexander
1801–1892
Samuel Stevenson Alexander
1804–1863
Jane Alexander
1807–1869
Tempa Alexander
1809–1886
Minerva D Alexander
1813–1863
Narcissa Alexander
1815–1897
Frances (Fannie, Fanny) Alexander
1817–1895
John M. Alexander
1819–1863
Mary Alexander
1821–1845
William Long Alexander
1823–1912
Fanny Alexander
1828–

Spouse & Children

MARRIAGE
11 January 1798
South Carolina, United States
children

(12)

  • Sarah M Alexander

    Female1798–1863Female

  • Abigail Alexander

    Female1801–1892Female

  • Samuel Stevenson Alexander

    Male1804–1863Male

  • Jane Alexander

    Female1807–1869Female

  • Tempa Alexander

    Female1809–1886Female

+7 More Children

Parents & Siblings

siblings

(1)

World Events (7)

1781 · The First Constitution

Age 4

Serving the newly created United States of America as the first constitution, the Articles of Confederation were an agreement among the 13 original states preserving the independence and sovereignty of the states. But with a limited central government, the Constitutional Convention came together to replace the Articles of Confederation with a more established Constitution and central government on where the states can be represented and voice their concerns and comments to build up the nation.
1783 · A Free America

Age 6

The Revolutionary War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris which gave the new nation boundries on which they could expand and trade with other countries without any problems.
1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

Age 23

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

Name Meaning

Scottish, English, German, Dutch; also found in many other cultures: from the personal name Alexander, classical Greek Alexandros, which probably originally meant ‘repulser of men (i.e. of the enemy)’, from alexein ‘to repel’ + andros, genitive of anēr ‘man’. Its popularity in the Middle Ages was due mainly to the Macedonian conqueror, Alexander the Great ( 356–323 bc )—or rather to the hero of the mythical versions of his exploits that gained currency in the so-called Alexander Romances. The name was also borne by various early Christian saints, including a patriarch of Alexandria ( ad c.250–326 ), whose main achievement was condemning the Arian heresy. The Gaelic form of the personal name is Alasdair, which has given rise to a number of Scottish and Irish patronymic surnames, for example Mc Allister . Alexander is a common forename in Scotland, often representing an Anglicized form of the Gaelic name. In North America the form Alexander has absorbed many cases of cognate names from other languages, for example Spanish Alejandro , Italian Alessandro , Greek Alexandropoulos, Russian Aleksandr, etc. (For forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 .) It has also been adopted as a Jewish name.

Possible Related Names

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Sources (3)

  • James (Jane) Alexander in household of M J Baker, "United States Census, 1870"
  • John Alexander, "Find A Grave Index"
  • John Alexander, "Find A Grave Index"

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