George Rowland Blake

Brief Life History of George Rowland

When George Rowland Blake was born on 14 March 1918, in Vineyard, Utah, Utah, United States, his father, Samuel Henry Blake, was 32 and his mother, Annie Matilda Bevan, was 36. He married Kathryn Merle Sumsion on 26 February 1941, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 daughter. He immigrated to World in 1939. In 1955, his occupation is listed as professor of soil physics in University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, United States. He died on 11 August 2016, in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States, at the age of 98, and was buried in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (23)

Do you know George Rowland? Do you have a story about him that you would like to share? Sign In or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

George Rowland Blake
1918–2016
Kathryn Merle Sumsion
1918–1984
Marriage: 26 February 1941
Carla Blake
1942–1994

Sources (20)

  • George Rowland Blake in household of Samuel Henry Blake, "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Church Census Records (Worldwide), 1914-1960"
  • George Blake, "United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, Births, and Marriages 1980-2014"
  • George Rowland Blake, "Utah, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1947"

Spouse and Children

World Events (8)

1919 · The Eighteenth Amendment

The Eighteenth Amendment established a prohibition on all intoxicating liquors in the United States. As a result of the Amendment, the Prohibition made way for bootlegging and speakeasies becoming popular in many areas. The Eighteenth Amendment was then repealed by the Twenty-first Amendment. Making it the first and only amendment that has been repealed.

1921 · One of The Oldest Coasters in the World

Utah is home to one of the oldest coasters in the world that is still operational. The Roller Coaster, at Lagoon Amusement park, is listed number 5.

1944 · The G.I Bill

The G.I. Bill was a law that provided a range of benefits for returning World War II veterans that were on active duty during the war and weren't dishonorably discharged. The goal was to provide rewards for all World War II veterans. The act avoided life insurance policy payouts because of political distress caused after the end of World War I. But the Benefits that were included were: Dedicated payments of tuition and living expenses to attend high school, college or vocational/technical school, low-cost mortgages, low-interest loans to start a business, as well as one year of unemployment compensation. By the mid-1950s, around 7.8 million veterans used the G.I. Bill education benefits.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish (England and central Scotland): variant of Black 1, meaning ‘swarthy’ or ‘dark-haired’, from a byform of the Old English adjective blæc, blac ‘black’, with change of vowel length.

English: nickname from Middle English blak(e) (Old English blāc) ‘wan, pale, white, fair’. In Middle English the two words blac and blāc, with opposite meanings, fell together as Middle English blake. In the absence of independent evidence as to whether the person referred to was dark or fair, it is now impossible to tell which sense was originally meant.

English (Norfolk): nickname from Middle English bleik, blaik>, blek(e) (Old Norse bleikr) ‘pale or sallow’ (in complexion).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Discover Even More

As a nonprofit, we offer free help to those looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a FREE Account

Search for Another Deceased Ancestor

Share this with your family and friends.