Leland L Johnson

Brief Life History of Leland L

When Leland L Johnson was born on 10 March 1870, in Loon Lake, Jackson, Minnesota, United States, his father, Timothy C Johnson, was 47 and his mother, Clarissa Stewart, was 34. He married Laura Virginia Loving on 23 December 1898, in Mesa, Colorado, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 daughter. He lived in Election Precinct 45, Las Animas, Colorado, United States in 1900 and Village of Oak Creek, Yavapai, Arizona, United States in 1910. He died on 18 June 1949, in Pomona, Los Angeles, California, United States, at the age of 79, and was buried in Pomona Cemetery, Pomona, Los Angeles, California, United States.

Photos and Memories (1)

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Family Time Line

Leland L Johnson
1870–1949
Laura Virginia Loving
1860–1932
Marriage: 23 December 1898
Doris Dunreath Johnson
1902–1992

Sources (11)

  • Leland L Johnson, "United States Census, 1900"
  • Leland L Johnson, "California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994"
  • Leland L Johnson, "California Death Index, 1940-1997"

Spouse and Children

World Events (8)

1872 · The Modoc War

Hostilities between Modoc Indians and white settlers resulted in the Modoc War during 1872-1873. A Modoc band of nearly 200 people, led by Captain Jack Kintpuash, was fleeing a forced relocation to a reservation occupied by their enemies, the Klamaths. The band had returned to their former land on Lost River, which now had white settlers occupying the area. The conflict erupted on November 29, 1872, when 40 troops were sent to move the Modocs back to the reservation. An argument erupted and shots were fired. Several were killed and the Modocs fled to “The Stronghold,” a large, cavernous lava bed. The holdout went on for months with several clashes. On April 11, 1873, General Edward Richard Sprigg Canby and Reverend Eleazar Thomas were killed by the Modocs during a negotiation. The Modocs lacked resources and supplies and eventually surrendered on July 4. In total, 2 Modocs and 71 enlisted military men lost their lives.

1879

Historical Boundaries: 1879: Jackson, Minnesota, United States

1891 · Angel Island Serves as Quarantine Station

Angel Island served as a quarantine station for those diagnosed with bubonic plague beginning in 1891. A quarantine station was built on the island which was funded by the federal government at the cost of $98,000. The disease spread to port cities around the world, including the San Francisco Bay Area, during the third bubonic plague pandemic, which lasted through 1909.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish: patronymic from the Middle English and Older Scots personal name Johan, Jo(h)n (see John ) + -son. It was often interchanged with Jenson and Janson . In North America, this surname has absorbed cognates from other languages, e.g. Norwegian, Danish, or North German Johnsen , Johannesen , Johannsen , Johansen , Jansen , Jantzen , and Jensen , Swedish Johnsson (see below), Johansson , Jonsson , and Jansson , Dutch Janssen , German Janz , Czech Jansa 1, and Slovenian Janša (see Jansa 2) and Janežič (see Janezic ). Johnson (including in the sense 2 below) is the second most frequent surname in the US. It is also the second most common surname among Native Americans and a very common surname among African Americans.

Americanized form (and a less common Swedish variant) of Swedish Johnsson: patronymic from the personal name John, a variant of Jon (see John ). Compare 1 above.

History: Surname Johnson was brought independently to North America by many different bearers from the 17th and 18th centuries onward. Andrew Johnson (1808–75), 17th president of the US, was born in Raleigh, NC, the younger son of Jacob Johnson and Mary (or Polly) McDonough. Little is known of his ancestors. The 36th president, Lyndon B. Johnson, dates his American forebears back seven generations to James Johnston (sic) (born c. 1662) who lived at Currowaugh, Nansemond, and Isle of Wight counties, VA. — Noted early bearers also include Marmaduke Johnson (died 1674), a printer who came from England to MA in 1660; Edward Johnson (1598–1672), a colonial chronicler who was baptized at St. George's parish, Canterbury, England, and emigrated to Boston in 1630; and Sir Nathaniel Johnson (c. 1645–1713), a colonial governor of Carolina, who came from County Durham, England.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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