Dwight Clarence Anderson

Brief Life History of Dwight Clarence

When Dwight Clarence Anderson was born on 19 August 1941, in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa, United States, his father, John Joplin Anderson, was 42 and his mother, Lillian Florence Tilley, was 40. He married Donna Lee O'Connor on 15 January 1960, in Iowa, United States. He died on 14 February 1985, in Ames, Story, Iowa, United States, at the age of 43, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Yell Township, Boone, Iowa, United States.

Photos and Memories (0)

Photos and Memories

Do you know Dwight Clarence? Do you have a story about him that you would like to share? Sign In or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

Dwight Clarence Anderson
1941–1985
Donna Lee O'Connor
1941–1976
Marriage: 15 January 1960

Sources (4)

  • Legacy NFS Source: Dwight Anderson - Published information: birth: 19 August 1941; Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa, United States
  • Dwight Anderson, "Find A Grave Index"
  • Dwight in entry for Harold Lloyd Anderson, "United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014"

Spouse and Children

World Events (8)

1942 · The Japanese American internment

Caused by the tensions between the United States and the Empire of Japan, the internment of Japanese Americans caused many to be forced out of their homes and forcibly relocated into concentration camps in the western states. More than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forced into these camps in fear that some of them were spies for Japan.

1944 · The G.I Bill

The G.I. Bill was a law that provided a range of benefits for returning World War II veterans that were on active duty during the war and weren't dishonorably discharged. The goal was to provide rewards for all World War II veterans. The act avoided life insurance policy payouts because of political distress caused after the end of World War I. But the Benefits that were included were: Dedicated payments of tuition and living expenses to attend high school, college or vocational/technical school, low-cost mortgages, low-interest loans to start a business, as well as one year of unemployment compensation. By the mid-1950s, around 7.8 million veterans used the G.I. Bill education benefits.

1955 · The Civil Rights Movement Begins

The civil rights movement was a movement to enforce constitutional and legal rights for African Americans that the other Americans enjoyed. By using nonviolent campaigns, those involved secured new recognition in laws and federal protection of all Americans. Moderators worked with Congress to pass of several pieces of legislation that overturned discriminatory practices.

Name Meaning

Scottish and northern English: patronymic from the personal name Ander(s), a northern Middle English form of Andrew , + son ‘son’. The frequency of the surname in Scotland is attributable, at least in part, to the fact that Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, so the personal name has long enjoyed great popularity there. Legend has it that the saint's relics were taken to Scotland in the 4th century by a certain Saint Regulus. In North America, this surname has absorbed many cognate or like-sounding surnames in other languages, notably Scandinavian (see 3 and 4 below), but also Ukrainian Andreychenko etc.

German: patronymic from the personal name Anders , hence a cognate of 1 above.

Americanized form (and a less common Swedish variant) of Swedish Andersson , a cognate of 1 above.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Discover Even More

As a nonprofit, we offer free help to those looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a FREE Account

Search for Another Deceased Ancestor

Share this with your family and friends.