Harry Clifton Bailey

Brief Life History of Harry Clifton

When Harry Clifton Bailey was born on 26 November 1900, in New Brunswick, Canada, his father, Abraham Duburg Bailey, was 22 and his mother, Gertrude Edith Banks, was 19. He married Mary Albina Knapper on 29 July 1929, in Moncton, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada. He lived in Queens, New Brunswick, Canada in 1901 and York, New Brunswick, Canada in 1911. He died on 4 June 1968, in Fredericton, York, New Brunswick, Canada, at the age of 67, and was buried in Fredericton Rural Cemetery Extension, Fredericton, York, New Brunswick, Canada.

Photos and Memories (0)

Photos and Memories

Do you know Harry Clifton? Do you have a story about him that you would like to share? Sign In or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

Harry Clifton Bailey
1900–1968
Mary Albina Knapper
1910–1988
Marriage: 29 July 1929

Sources (7)

  • Harrold Bailey in household of Abrahm Bailey, "Canada Census, 1911"
  • Harry Clifton Bailey, "New Brunswick, Provincial Returns of Births and Late Registrations, 1810-1906"
  • Harry Clifton Bailey, "New Brunswick Provincial Marriages 1789-1950"

Spouse and Children

World Events (3)

1901 · Hartland Covered Bridge

July 4, 1901, the Hartland covered bridge was finished. It spans across the Saint John River, making it the longest covered bridge. Until it was built, the only way across the river was by ferry.

1937 · Miramichi Strike

August 20, 1937, the Miramichi lumber strike took place. Over 1,500 millworkers and longshoremen struck 14 lumber firms for wage increases.

1955 · Recorder Low Temperature

In 1955, New Brunswick broke the record with a freezing temperature of -47.2° C, in Sisson Dam

Name Meaning

English: status name for a steward or official, from Middle English bailli ‘manager, administrator’ (Old French baillis, from Late Latin baiulivus, an adjectival derivative of baiulus ‘attendant, carrier, porter’).

English: habitational name from Bailey in Little Mitton, Lancashire, named with Old English beg ‘berry’ + lēah ‘woodland clearing’.

English: occasionally a topographic name for someone who lived by the outer wall of a castle, from Middle English (Old French) bailli ‘outer courtyard of a castle’ (Old French bail(le) ‘enclosure’, a derivative of bailer ‘to enclose’). This term became a placename in its own right, denoting a district beside a fortification or wall, as in the case of the Old Bailey in London, which formed part of the early medieval outer wall of the city.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Discover Even More

As a nonprofit, we offer free help to those looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a FREE Account

Search for Another Deceased Ancestor

Share this with your family and friends.