Jean Gilchrist Annie Smith

23 May 1921–5 December 1996 (Age 75)
Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

The Life of Jean Gilchrist Annie

When Jean Gilchrist Annie Smith was born on 23 May 1921, in Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, her father, Robert Elgin Smith, was 29 and her mother, Jean Jarvis, was 20. She married Cecil William Myers on 14 April 1944, in Oakland, Alameda, California, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son. She died on 5 December 1996, in Sonora, Tuolumne, California, United States, at the age of 75.

Photos & Memories (6)

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Family Time Line

Cecil William Myers
1918–2003
Jean Gilchrist Annie Smith
1921–1996
Marriage: 14 April 1944
Stephen Howard Myers
1948–1966

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
14 April 1944
Oakland, Alameda, California, United States
children

(1)

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(3)

World Events (8)

1923 · The President Dies of a Heart Attack

Age 2

Warrant G. Harding died of a heart attack in the Palace hotel in San Francisco.
1934 · Alcatraz Island Becomes Federal Penitentiary

Age 13

Alcatraz Island officially became Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary on August 11, 1934. The island is situated in the middle of frigid water and strong currents of the San Francisco Bay, which deemed it virtually inescapable. Alcatraz became known as the toughest prison in America and was seen as a “last resort prison.” Therefore, Alcatraz housed some of America’s most notorious prisoners such as Al Capone and Robert Franklin Stroud. Due to the exorbitant cost of running the prison, and the deterioration of the buildings due to salt spray, Alcatraz Island closed as a penitentiary on March 21, 1963. 
1941

Age 20

Japanese attack Pearl Harbor.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a worker in metal, from Middle English smith (Old English smið, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Metalworking was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents were perhaps the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is the most frequent of all American surnames; it has also absorbed, by assimilation and translation, cognates and equivalents from many other languages (for forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 ).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (1)

  • Jean A Mcvey, "United States Social Security Death Index"

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