Lydia Elizabeth Hart

12 September 1894–6 March 1986 (Age 91)
Euphemia Township, Ontario, Canada

The Life of Lydia Elizabeth

When Lydia Elizabeth Hart was born on 12 September 1894, in Euphemia Township, Ontario, Canada, her father, Stanley Hart, was 33 and her mother, Ellenor Manton, was 31. She married Carl Bradley Sartwell Sr. on 24 June 1916, in Los Angeles, California, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son and 1 daughter. She lived in Los Nietos, Los Angeles, California, United States in 1910 and Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States for about 20 years. She died on 6 March 1986, in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States, at the age of 91, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Chatsworth, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States.

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Family Time Line

Carl Bradley Sartwell Sr.
1892–1956
Lydia Elizabeth Hart
1894–1986
Marriage: 24 June 1916
Carl Bradley Sartwell Jr
1917–2015
Eva Pearl Sartwell
1931–1935

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
24 June 1916
Los Angeles, California, United States
children

(2)

Parents and Siblings

    Stanley Hart

    Male1861–1942Male

    Ellenor Manton

    Female1862–1939Female

siblings

(9)

+4 More Children

World Events (8)

1896 · Plessy vs. Ferguson

Age 2

A landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court upholding the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities if the segregated facilities were equal in quality. It's widely regarded as one of the worst decisions in U.S. Supreme Court history.
1909 · History of Van Nuys, CA

Age 15

"In 1909 the Suburban Homes Company, a syndicate led by H. J. Whitley, general manager of the Board of Control, along with Harry Chandler, H. G. Otis, M. H. Sherman and O. F. Brandt purchased 48,000 acres of the Farming and Milling Company for $2,500,000.[1] Henry E. Huntington extended his Pacific Electric Railway (Red Cars) through the Valley to Owensmouth (now Canoga Park). The Suburban Home Company laid out plans for roads and the towns of Van Nuys, Reseda (Marian) and Canoga Park (Owensmouth). The rural areas were annexed into the city of Los Angeles in 1915.[2][3] On April 2, 1915 H. J. Whitley purchased the Suburban Home Company so that he would have complete control for finishing the development.[4] The town was founded in 1911 and named for Isaac Newton Van Nuys, one of its developers.[5] It was annexed by Los Angeles on May 22, 1915,[6] after completion of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, providing it with the water required for further growth.[7] Van Nuys was the first new stop on the San Fernando Line of the Pacific Electric Railway red cars system, which boosted its early land sales and commercial success.[5] Van Nuys became the Valley's satellite Los Angeles municipal civic center with the 1932 Art Deco Valley Municipal Building (Van Nuys City Hall), a visual landmark and Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, starting the present-day Government Center complex of government services buildings.[5] In 1991, Marvin Braude, a member of the Los Angeles City Council, redesignated a 45-block area of Van Nuys as a part of Sherman Oaks.[8] This redesignated area included the community of Magnolia Woods.[9] Some area residents had presented a petition and several original deeds that stated ""Sherman Oaks"" to Braude. They argued that the area was originally a part of Sherman Oaks until the 1960s, when ZIP Codes labeling the area as Van Nuys were established.[8] In October 2005, the Metro Orange Line opened with two stations. In 2014, a ""Great Streets"" project was introduced by Mayor Eric Garcetti with Van Nuys Bl"
1918 · Attempting to Stop the War

Age 24

To end World War I, President Wilson created a list of principles to be used as negotiations for peace among the nations. Known as The Fourteen Points, the principles were outlined in a speech on war aimed toward the idea of peace but most of the Allied forces were skeptical of this Wilsonian idealism.

Name Meaning

1 English and North German: from a personal name or nickname meaning ‘stag’, Middle English hert, Middle Low German hërte, harte.2 German: variant spelling of Hardt 1 and 2.3 Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name or a nickname from German and Yiddish hart ‘hard’.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Lydia E Sartwell in household of Carl B Sartwell, "United States Census, 1930"
  • Lydia E Sartwell in household of Carl B Sartwell, "United States Census, 1920"
  • Lydia Sartwell in household of Carl B Sartwell, "United States Census, 1940"

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