Lucinda Harris

Brief Life History of Lucinda

When Lucinda Harris was born about 1816, in Georgia, United States, her father, James King Harris, was 37 and her mother, Charlotte Mackey, was 30. She married Wiley Giles Braddy on 7 April 1836, in Jones, Georgia, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 7 daughters. She lived in District 300, Jones, Georgia, United States in 1860 and District 299, Jones, Georgia, United States in 1880. She died in 1881, in United States, at the age of 66.

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Family Time Line

Wiley Giles Braddy
1813–1886
Lucinda Harris
1816–1881
Marriage: 7 April 1836
Mary Jane Braddy
about 1837–1900
Lavinia E. Besterday Braddy
1838–1896
Joanna Braddy
1857–
Howell G. Braddy
1839–1861
Frances A. Braddy
1843–1918
Sarah A. Braddy
1845–
James "Jim" Lewton Braddy
1848–1922
Margaret C. Braddy
1850–1870
Taylor B Braddy
1854–1912
Georgia Ann Braddy
1860–

Sources (8)

  • Loucinda Braddy in household of Wylly Braddy, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Legacy NFS Source: Lucinda Harris - Government record: Census record: birth: about 1816; Georgia
  • Lucinda Harris, "Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950"

World Events (8)

1819 · Panic! of 1819

With the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars the global market for trade was down. During this time, America had its first financial crisis and it lasted for only two years. 

1832 · Worcester v. Georgia

In 1830, U.S. President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act which required all Native Americans to relocate to areas west of the Mississippi River. That same year, Governor Gilmer of Georgia signed an act which claimed for Georgia all Cherokee territories within the boundaries of Georgia. The Cherokees protested the act and the case made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The case, Worcester v. Georgia, ruled in 1832 that the United States, not Georgia, had rights over the Cherokee territories and Georgia laws regarding the Cherokee Nation were voided. President Jackson didn’t enforce the ruling and the Cherokees did not cede their land and Georgia held a land lottery anyway for white settlers.

1835 · Treaty of New Echota

A minority group of Cherokees including John Ridge, Major Ridge, Elias Boudinot, and Stand Waite, signed the Treaty of New Echota which ceded all Cherokee territory east of the Mississippi in exchange for five million dollars. The majority of Cherokees did not agree and 16,000 Cherokee signatures were gathered to protest the treaty. Boudinot and both Ridges were killed several years later by angry Cherokees for signing the treaty.

Name Meaning

English (southern England and south Wales): from the personal name Harry + genitival -s. This surname is also established in Ireland, taken there principally during the Plantation of Ulster. However, in some cases, particularly in families coming from County Mayo, Harris can be an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hEarchadha. This surname is also very common among African Americans.

American shortened and altered form of Greek surnames begining with Cha(r)-, such as Chasandrinos (variant of Kassandrinos, a habitational name from the Kassandra peninsula of Chalkidiki), and various patronymics from the personal name Charalampos (see Charos ). In North America, the surname Harris may possibly also originate from a transferred use of the Greek personal (given) name Charis or Harris (shortened forms of Charalampos) as a surname (i.e. as a replacement of the original surname).

Americanized form of various like-sounding Jewish surnames.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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