Mary Wood

Brief Life History of Mary

When Mary Wood was born in 1793, in Williamstown, Charlottenburg, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada, her father, Benjamin Wood, was 32 and her mother, Agnes Benedict, was 26. She married Duncan Furgeson on 20 March 1815, in Williamstown, South Glengarry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 6 daughters. She lived in Finch, Stormont, Canada West, British Colonial America in 1851 and Cornwall, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada in 1851. She died on 7 March 1852, in Williamstown, South Glengarry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario, Canada, at the age of 59.

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Family Time Line

Duncan Furgeson
1790–
Mary Wood
1793–1852
Marriage: 20 March 1815
John Ferguson
1816–1910
Jane Ferguson
1816–1901
Mary Furguson
1818–
Christina Furguson
1820–
Alexander B. Furguson
1822–
Duncan Ferguson
1820–
Catherine Ferguson
1827–1926
Agnes Ferguson
1830–1907
Elizabeth Furguson
1834–1924

Sources (7)

  • Mary Ferguson, "Canada Census, 1851"
  • Legacy NFS Source: Mary Wood - birth:
  • Mary Wood, "Ontario, Marriages, 1800-1910"

Parents and Siblings

World Events (1)

1841

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) laid out the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union in 1840. The Province of Canada was made up of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada). The two regions were governed jointly until Confederation in 1867. Canada West then became Ontario and Canada East became Quebec.

Name Meaning

English: mainly a topographic name for someone who lived in or by a wood, from Middle English wode ‘wood’ (Old English wudu). In North America, the English form of the surname has absorbed cognates from other languages, such as French Bois and Polish Les .

English: in a few cases, a nickname for an eccentric or perhaps a violent person, from Middle English wode ‘frenzied, wild’ (Old English wōd).

Americanized form of French Gadbois .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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