Hannah King

Brief Life History of Hannah

When Hannah King was born about 1835, in Thetford, Orange, Vermont, United States, her father, John Walker King, was 33 and her mother, Susan W. Smith, was 31. She married Almon Aldrich on 12 November 1855, in West Fairlee, Orange, Vermont, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 5 daughters. She lived in New Hampshire, United States in 1870 and Strafford, Orange, Vermont, United States in 1880. She died on 15 July 1880, in Vermont, United States, at the age of 46, and was buried in Post Mills Cemetery, Thetford, Orange, Vermont, United States.

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Family Time Line

Almon Aldrich
1832–1899
Hannah King
about 1835–1880
Marriage: 12 November 1855
Mary Angeline Aldrich
1858–
Sadie J. Aldridge
1878–1912
John Almon R. Aldrich
1862–1886
Sarah Aldrich
1864–
Arthur Joshua Aldrich
1866–1929
Sarah L. Aldrich
1867–
Emma Lavinia Aldrich
1871–1923
William C Aldrich
1874–1874

Sources (33)

  • Hannah King in household of John King, "United States Census, 1850"
  • Legacy NFS Source: Hannah King - Government record: birth: about 1835; Thetford, Orange, Vermont, United States
  • Hannah Aldrich, "Vermont, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1732-2005"

Parents and Siblings

World Events (6)

1836 · Remember the Alamo

Being a monumental event in the Texas Revolution, The Battle of the Alamo was a thirteen-day battle at the Alamo Mission near San Antonio. In the early morning of the final battle, the Mexican Army advanced on the Alamo. Quickly being overrun, the Texian Soldiers quickly withdrew inside the building. The battle has often been overshadowed by events from the Mexican–American War, But the Alamo gradually became known as a national battle site and later named an official Texas State Shrine.

1846

U.S. acquires vast tracts of Mexican territory in wake of Mexican War including California and New Mexico.

1863

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

Name Meaning

English: nickname from Middle English king ‘king’ (Old English cyning, cyng), perhaps acquired by someone with kingly qualities or as a pageant name by someone who had acted the part of a king or had been chosen as the master of ceremonies or ‘king’ of an event such as a tournament, festival or folk ritual. In North America, the surname King has absorbed several European cognates and equivalents with the same meaning, for example German König (see Koenig ) and Küng, French Roy , Slovenian, Croatian, or Serbian Kralj , Polish Krol . It is also very common among African Americans. It is also found as an artificial Jewish surname.

English: occasionally from the Middle English personal name King, originally an Old English nickname from the vocabulary word cyning, cyng ‘king’.

Irish: adopted for a variety of names containing the syllable (which means ‘king’ in Irish).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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