Jeffrey Clay Smith

5 February 1882–21 March 1950 (Age 68)
Blanco, Blanco, Texas, United States

The Life of Jeffrey Clay

When Jeffrey Clay Smith was born on 5 February 1882, in Blanco, Blanco, Texas, United States, his father, John Michael Smith, was 51 and his mother, Elizabeth J Neil, was 41. He lived in Blanco, Texas, United States in 1900. He died on 21 March 1950, in Johnson City, Blanco, Texas, United States, at the age of 68, and was buried in Blanco Cemetery, Blanco, Blanco, Texas, United States.

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Family Time Line

John Michael Smith
1830–1905
Elizabeth J Neil
1840–1918
George Thomas Smith
1861–1931
Fannie Leona Smith
1862–1948
Tiffney M. Smith
1868–1951
Maggie Ann Smith
1869–1959
John Edwin Smith
1872–1947
Eva Virginia Smith
1874–1960
Charles Alvin Smith
1876–1956
Kenneth Harvey Smith
1879–1945
Jeffrey Clay Smith
1882–1950

Parents and Siblings

    John Michael Smith

    Male1830–1905Male

    Elizabeth J Neil

    Female1840–1918Female

siblings

(9)

+4 More Children

World Events (8)

1886

Age 4

Statue of Liberty is dedicated.
1894 · Texas Files Lawsuit Against Standard Oil Company

Age 12

Under the direction of Governor Jim Hogg, Texas filed a lawsuit against John D. Rockefeller for violating state monopoly laws. Hogg argued that Standard Oil Company and Water-Piece Oil Company of Missouri were engaged in illegal practices like price fixing, rebates, and consolidation. Rockefeller was indicted, but never tried in a court of law; other employees of his company were convicted as guilty.
1900 · Gold for Cash!

Age 18

This Act set a price at which gold could be traded for paper money.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a worker in metal, from Middle English smith (Old English smið, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Metalworking was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents were perhaps the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is the most frequent of all American surnames; it has also absorbed, by assimilation and translation, cognates and equivalents from many other languages (for forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 ).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Jeff Smith in household of John M Smith, "United States Census, 1900"
  • Jeff Smith, "United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942"
  • Jeff C Smith, "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976"

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