Lydia Court

Brief Life History of Lydia

When Lydia Court was born about 1858, in Smethwick, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom, her father, John Court, was 41 and her mother, Elizabeth Smith, was 34. She immigrated to Utah, United States in 1863 and lived in England, United Kingdom in 1861. She died on 21 August 1863, at the age of 6.

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Family Time Line

John Court
1818–1887
Elizabeth Smith
1825–1893
Phoebe Courts
1850–1893
Lydia Court
1858–1863
George W. Courts
1861–
Sarah Anne Courts
1856–1940
Mary Elizabeth Court
1867–1924

Sources (3)

  • Laida Court in household of John Court, "England and Wales Census, 1861"
  • Lydia Coup, "England, Staffordshire, Church Records, 1538-1944"
  • Lydia Court, "Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database, 1847-1868"

World Events (2)

1863

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

1863 · The Battle at Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg involved the largest number of casualties of the entire Civil war and is often described as the war's turning point. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers lost their lives during the three-day Battle. To honor the fallen soldiers, President Abraham Lincoln read his historic Gettysburg Address and helped those listening by redefining the purpose of the war.

Name Meaning

English: topographic or occupational name from Middle English curt, court ‘large house’ (a word of the same ultimately Latin origin as 2 below), denoting someone who lived or worked in a manor house or castle, a courtly retainer.

French: topographic name from Old French co(u)rt ‘court, farmyard’ (from Latin cohors, cors, genitive cohortis, cortis ‘court, farmyard, enclosure’).

English and French: nickname for a physically small man, or ironically for a large man, from the adjective Middle English curt, Old French co(u)rt ‘short, small’ (from Latin curtus ‘curtailed, truncated, cut short, broken off’). Compare French Lecourt .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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