Lydia Hale

1800–
Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire, United States

The Life of Lydia

When Lydia Hale was born on 4 April 1800, in Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire, United States, her father, Jonathan Roberds Hale, was 39 and her mother, Lydia Johnson, was 37.

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Family Time Line

Lydia Hale
1800–
Orvill Cook
1798–1832

Spouse & Children

  • Female1800–Female

  • Orvill Cook

    Male1798–1832Male

Parents & Siblings

siblings

(7)

  • Ebenezer Hale

    Male1787–1871Male

  • James Hale

    Male1788–1864Male

  • Jonathan Roberts Hale

    Male1790–1842Male

  • John Hale

    Male1795–1795Male

  • John Hale

    Male1798–1840Male

+2 More Children

World Events (3)

1803

Age 3

France sells Louisiana territories to U.S.A.
1803 · The U.S doubles in size

Age 3

The United States purchased all the Louisiana territory (828,000 sq. mi) from France, only paying 15 million dollars (A quarter trillion today) for the land. In the purchase, the US obtained the land that makes up 15 US states and 2 Canadian Provinces. The United States originally wanted to purchase of New Orleans and the lands located on the coast around it, but quickly accepted the bargain that Napoleon Bonaparte offered.
1808 · Concord Becomes the Capital

Age 8

In 1808, Concord became the capital of New Hampshire. It was originally the Penacook Plantation given to the state by the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

Name Meaning

1 English (also well established in South Wales): topographic name for someone who lived in a nook or hollow, from Old English and Middle English hale, dative of h(e)alh ‘nook’, ‘hollow’. In northern England the word often has a specialized meaning, denoting a piece of flat alluvial land by the side of a river, typically one deposited in a bend. In southeastern England it often referred to a patch of dry land in a fen. In some cases the surname may be a habitational name from any of the several places in England named with this fossilized inflected form, which would originally have been preceded by a preposition, e.g. in the hale or at the hale.2 English: from a Middle English personal name derived from either of two Old English bynames, Hæle ‘hero’ or Hægel, which is probably akin to Germanic Hagano ‘hawthorn’ ( see Hain 2).3 Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Céile ( see McHale ).

Possible Related Names

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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    Sources

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