Wilford Woodruff

Male1 March 1807–2 September 1898

Brief Life History of Wilford

When Wilford Woodruff was born on 1 March 1807, in Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, his father, Aphek Woodruff, was 28 and his mother, Beulah Thompson, was 24. He married Phebe Whittemore Carter on 13 April 1837, in Geauga, Ohio, United States. They were the parents of at least 4 sons and 5 daughters. He immigrated to Utah, United States in 1850 and lived in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States for about 10 years and Salt Lake, Utah, United States in 1880. He died on 2 September 1898, in San Francisco, California, United States, at the age of 91, and was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (46)

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Family Time Line

Wilford Woodruff
1807–1898
Phebe Whittemore Carter
1807–1885
Marriage: 13 April 1837
Sarah Emma Woodruff
1838–1840
Wilford Woodruff
1840–1921
Phoebe Amelia Woodruff
1842–1919
Susan Cornelia Woodruff
1843–1897
Joseph Woodruff
1845–1846
Ezra Woodruff
1846–1846
Shuah Carter Woodruff
1847–1848
Beulah Augusta Woodruff
1851–1905
Aphek Woodruff
1853–1853

Sources (125)

  • Wilford Woodruff in entry for David Patten Woodruff, "California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994"
  • Wilford Woodruff, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Wilford Woodruff in entry for Ensign Woodruff and Anna Sophia Jacobsen Hoggan, "Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1940"

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    13 April 1837Geauga, Ohio, United States
  • Children (9)

    +4 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings (3)

    World Events (8)

    1808

    Age 1

    Atlantic slave trade abolished.

    1829 · Farmington Canal Opened

    Age 22

    Farmington Canal spans 2,476 acres, starting from New Haven, Connecticut, and on to Northampton, Massachusetts. The groundbreaking for the canal was in 1825 and opened in 1829.

    1832 · The Black Hawk War

    Age 25

    Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.

    Name Meaning

    English: from Middle English woderove ‘woodruff, sweet woodruff’ (Old English wudurofe), a sweet-scented plant. The leaves of the plant have a sweet smell and the surname may also have been a nickname for one who used it as a perfume, or perhaps an ironical nickname for a malodorous person. Alternatively, perhaps a topographic name for someone who lived at or near a place where woodruff grew. There may have been some confusion with Woodrow .

    History: Two English families brought the name Woodruff to the American colonies: those of Matthew Woodruff and of John and Ann Woodruffe. The latter migrated to Lynn, MA, from Kent, and moved to Southampton, Long Island, NY, before 1640. John and Ann's many descendants were established in NJ, NC, and SC by 1790. The city of Woodruff, SC, is named for this family. The name is variously spelled Woodrove, Woodroffe, Woodruffe, Woodrough, and Woodruff in colonial records.

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Story Highlight

    Martha Spence Journal 1850-1860

    Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Source of Trail Excerpt:Heywood, Martha Spence, Journals 1850-[1860], vol. 1, 3-14.Read Trail Excerpt: At Bethlehem camp we remained two weeks after I joine …

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