Zemira Palmer

Brief Life History of Zemira

When Zemira Palmer was born on 9 August 1831, in Loughborough Township, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada, his father, George Palmer Jr, was 36 and his mother, Phebe Draper, was 33. He married Sally Knight on 1 December 1851, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 6 daughters. He lived in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States in 1839 and Provo, Utah, Utah, United States in 1860. He registered for military service in 1847. He died on 22 October 1880, in Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States, at the age of 49, and was buried in Orderville Cemetery, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (142)

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Family Time Line

Zemira Palmer
1831–1880
Sally Knight
1836–1916
Marriage: 1 December 1851
Alma Zemira Palmer
1853–1925
Mary Palmer
1855–1855
Martha Palmer
1855–1855
Lydia Amelia Palmer
1856–1896
Phebe Palmer
1858–1936
James William Palmer
1860–1931
George Asael Palmer
1862–1938
Jesse Milo Palmer
1864–1909
Emma Palmer
1867–1947
Newel Knight Palmer
1870–1932
Joseph Palmer
1874–1961
Chloe Palmer
1878–1916

Sources (156)

  • Zemira Palmer, "United States Census, 1880"
  • Utah, U.S., Select Marriages, 1887-1966
  • Utah, U.S., Death and Military Death Certificates, 1904-1961

World Events (8)

1832 · The Black Hawk War

Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.

1839 · Nauvoo is Settled

After the Saints had been chased out of Missouri they moved to a swampy area located next to the Mississippi River. Here they settled and named the place Nauvoo which translates into the city beautiful.

1845 · Oh My Father

"In October 1845, the newspaper Times and Seasons published a poem written by Eliza R. Snow entitled ""My Father in Heaven."" It has become the well known hymn, ""Oh My Father."" The song is only one in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hymnbook that referrs to a Heavenly Mother."

Name Meaning

English: nickname from Middle English palmer(e) ‘palmer, pilgrim to the Holy Land’ (Anglo-Norman French palmer, Old French pa(l)mer, paum(i)er), so called from the palm branch carried by such pilgrims. The term was also used to denote an itinerant monk who traveled from shrine to shrine under a vow of poverty. This surname is also common in Ireland, where it has been recorded from the 13th century onward.

Irish: when not of English origin (see 1 above), a surname adopted for Gaelic Ó Maolfhoghmhair (see Milford ), the name of an ecclesiastical family.

Swedish (mainly Palmér): ornamental name formed with palm ‘palm tree’ + the suffix -ér (a derivative of Latin -erius) or -er (from German).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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