Elizabeth Barrett

Brief Life History of Elizabeth

When Elizabeth Barrett was born on 19 August 1837, in Newton, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom, her father, Samuel Barrett, was 37 and her mother, Deborah Evans, was 32. She married Edward Haddock on 23 November 1862, in Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son and 4 daughters. She immigrated to Utah, United States in 1862 and lived in Cheadle Bulkeley, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom in 1851 and Rich, Utah, United States in 1870. She died on 31 August 1900, in Bloomington, Bear Lake, Idaho, United States, at the age of 63, and was buried in Bloomington, Bear Lake, Idaho, United States.

Photos and Memories (17)

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Family Time Line

Edward Haddock
1839–1900
Elizabeth Barrett
1837–1900
Marriage: 23 November 1862
Edward John Haddock
1865–1923
Sarah Elizabeth Haddock
1868–1950
Mary Emeline Haddock
1869–1949
Lilla Ann Haddock
1870–1895
Deborah Ellen Haddock
1872–1920

Sources (35)

  • Elizabeth R Heddock in household of Edward Heddock, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Eliza Barrett, "England and Wales Birth Registration Index, 1837-2008"
  • Elizabeth Barrett Haddock, "BillionGraves Index"

World Events (8)

1842 · Mines and Collieries Act of 1842

The Parliment of the United Kingdom passed the Mines and Collieries Act of 1842, mostly commonly known as the Mines Act of 1842. This act made it so that nobody under the age of ten could work in the mines and also females in general could not be employed.

1843

Dickens A Christmas Carol was first published.

1854 · St. George's Hall

In 1854, St. George's Hall was completed. The site that it sits on is were the Liverpool Infirmary was previously located. The hall was built for entertainment.

Name Meaning

English and Irish (of Norman origin): probably a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French barat, Middle English bar(r)at, bar(r)et(te) ‘trouble, distress’, later ‘deception, fraud; contention, strife’. Through Norman settlement it also became common in Ireland, where it was Gaelicized as Baróid (Munster) and Baréid (Connacht).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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