William Simmons Smith

4 July 1827–14 July 1900 (Age 73)
Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England

The Life Summary of William Simmons

William Simmons Smith was born on 4 July 1827, in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England as the son of Thomas Smith. He married Margaret Rebecca Bird on 15 November 1856, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 3 daughters. He lived in Utah, United States in 1870 and Salt Lake City Ward 1, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States in 1900. He died on 14 July 1900, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States, at the age of 73, and was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (1)

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Family Time Line

William Simmons Smith
1827–1900
Margaret Rebecca Bird
1837–1914
Marriage: 15 November 1856
Joseph Smith
1857–1857
Edmund Fuller Smith
1858–1929
Margaret Pricilla Smith
1860–1912
Thomas Lafayette Smith
1862–1869
Sarah Melinda Smith Inabnit
1864–1957
Charles Henry Smith
1867–1879
George Albert Smith
1869–1912
Mary Elizabeth Smith
1874–1955
James Arthur Smith
1879–1952

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    15 November 1856Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
  • Children

    (9)

    +4 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings

    (1)

    World Events (8)

    1830
    Age 3
    Eclectic Period (Art and Antiques).
    1833 · The Factory Act Restricts Child Labor
    Age 6
    The Factory Act restricted the hours women and children could work in textile mills. No child under the age of 9 were allowed to work, and children ages 9-13 could not work longer than 9 hours per day. Children up to the age of 13 were required to receive at least two hours of schooling, six days per week.
    1848
    Age 21
    Find A Grave website photo indicates establishment of the cemetery in 1848. Located at the NE corner of 4th Avenue and N Street. Salt Lake City Cemetery is in The Avenues neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah. Approximately 120,000 persons are buried in the cemetery. Many religious leaders and politicians, particularly many leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) lie in the cemetery. It encompasses over 250 acres and contains 9 1?2 miles of roads. It is the largest city-operated cemetery in the United States. The first burial occurred on September 27, 1847, when George Wallace buried his child, Mary Wallace. The burial was two months after the Mormon pioneers had settled the Salt Lake Valley. In 1849, George Wallace, Daniel Wells, and Joseph Heywood surveyed 20 acres at the same site for the area's burial grounds. In 1851, Salt Lake City was incorporated and the 20 acres officially became the Salt Lake City Cemetery with George Wallace as its first sexton.

    Name Meaning

    English and Scottish: occupational name denoting a worker in metal, especially iron, such as a blacksmith or farrier, from Middle English smith ‘smith’ (Old English smith, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Early examples are also found in the Latin form Faber . Metal-working was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents in other languages were the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is also the most frequent of all surnames in the US. It is very common among African Americans and Native Americans (see also 5 below). This surname (in any of the two possible English senses; see also below) is also found in Haiti. See also Smither .English: from Middle English smithe ‘smithy, forge’ (Old English smiththe). The surname may be topographic, for someone who lived in or by a blacksmith's shop, occupational, for someone who worked in one, or habitational, from a place so named, such as Smitha in King's Nympton (Devon). Compare Smithey .Irish and Scottish: sometimes adopted for Gaelic Mac Gobhann, Irish Mac Gabhann ‘son of the smith’. See McGowan .

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Smithe
    Smither
    Smithey
    Smyth
    Smythe
    McGowan
    Smead
    Faber

    Sources (43)

    • William Smith in entry for James A Smith, "Montana, County Births and Deaths, 1840-2004"
    • William Smith in household of Thomas Smith, "England and Wales Census, 1851"
    • W. S. Smith in entry for J. A. Smith and G. M. Fisher, "Montana, County Marriages, 1865-1950"

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