Thomas John

22 January 1820–25 January 1890 (Age 70)
Mathry, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom

The Life Summary of Thomas

When Thomas John was born on 22 January 1820, in Mathry, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom, his father, William John, was 28 and his mother, Letitia Phillips, was 30. He married Margaret Thomas on 14 July 1840, in Mathry, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 4 daughters. He lived in Utah, United States in 1870. In 1850, at the age of 32, his occupation is listed as cordwainer- shoe cobbler in Mathry, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom. He died on 25 January 1890, in Portage, Box Elder, Utah, United States, at the age of 70, and was buried in Portage, Box Elder, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (63)

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Family Time Line

Thomas John
1820–1890
Margaret Thomas
1814–1894
Marriage: 14 July 1840
Thomas John
1835–1835
Phoebe John
1837–1872
William Henry John
1841–1916
Charles John
1843–1909
Ann John
1845–1924
James John
1846–1927
Levi John
1849–1920
Henry John
1851–1922
Letitia John
1853–1914
Mary Jane John
1855–1934

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    14 July 1840Mathry, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom
  • Children

    (10)

    +5 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings

    (5)

    World Events (8)

    1821 · Financial Relief for Public Land
    Age 1
    A United States law to provide financial relief for the purchasers of Public Lands. It permitted the earlier buyers, that couldn't pay completely for the land, to return the land back to the government. This granted them a credit towards the debt they had on land. Congress, also, extended credit to buyer for eight more years. Still while being in economic panic and the shortage of currency made by citizens, the government hoped that with the time extension, the economy would improve.
    1831 · Merthyr Uprising 
    Age 11
    Sparked by a depression that was going through Wales the previous three years, the Merthyr uprisings were carried out by workers that were in debt. In the process, twenty-four people were killed and twenty-six were arrested. Troops were brought in to stop the protestors.
    1839 · The Rebecca Riots Take Place
    Age 19
    The Rebecca Riots were a group of protests in west Wales from 1839-1843. The people involved were mostly poor farmers, primarily men dressed as women. The group was called “Rebecca and her daughters”, a title believed to have come the book of Genesis. They mostly fought against the toll-gates. There is only record of one death during the riots: a young Sarah Williams had been warned that the rioters were coming, but upon refusing to leave, was killed.

    Name Meaning

    English and Welsh: ultimately from the Hebrew personal name Yoḥanan ‘Jehovah has favored (me with a son)’ or ‘may Jehovah favor (this child)’. This personal name was adopted into Latin (via Greek) as Johannes, and has enjoyed enormous popularity in Europe throughout the Christian era, being given in honor of Saint John the Baptist, precursor of Christ, and of Saint John the Evangelist, author of the fourth gospel, as well as the nearly one thousand other Christian saints who bore the name. Some of the principal forms of the personal name in other languages are: Welsh Ieuan, Evan, Siôn, and Ioan; Scottish Ia(i)n; Irish Séan; German Johann, Johannes; Dutch and Slavic Jan; French Jean; Italian Giovanni; Spanish Juan; Portuguese João; Greek Iōannēs (vernacular Giannis, Yannis); Russian Ivan. There were a number of different forms of the name in Middle English, including Jan(e), a male name (see Jayne ); Jen (see Jenkin ); Jon(e) (see Jones ); and Han(n) (see Hann ). By the beginning of the 14th century John rivalled William in popularity and has always been a favorite name. Johan became Jo(h)n, and another Old French form Jehan was shortened to Jan and Jen, giving rise to Old French and Middle English diminutives such as Jonin, Janin, and Jenin. More common in Middle English were Jankin, Jonkin, and Jenkin, which were Middle Dutch pet forms introduced after the Conquest by Flemish and Picard settlers. The most common pet form of John was Jack, another borrowing from Flemish and Picard usage. Han may sometimes have been a short form of Johan but was more usually a pet form of Henry. There were also various Middle English feminine versions of this name (e.g. Joan, Jehan), some of which were indistinguishable from masculine forms. The distinction on grounds of gender between John and Joan was not firmly established in English until the 17th century. It was even later that Jean and Jane were specialized as specifically female names in English; bearers of these surnames and their derivatives are more likely to derive them from a male ancestor than a female. As a surname in the British Isles, John is particularly frequent in Wales, where it is a late formation representing Welsh Siôn rather than the older form Ieuan (which gave rise to the surname Evan ). In North America, the English form of the surname has absorbed many cognates from other languages, e.g. Assyrian/Chaldean Youkhana , French Jean , Hungarian János (see Janos ), Slovenian Janež and Janeš (see Janes ), Czech Jan , Albanian Gjoni , and their derivatives (see examples at Johnson ). The name John is also found among Christians in southern India (compare Ninan and Yohannan ), but since South Indians traditionally do not have hereditary surnames, the southern Indian name was in most cases registered as such only after immigration of its bearers to the US.German: from a North German and Silesian variant of the personal name Johannes . This surname is also found in France (Alsace and Lorraine). Compare Yohn .

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Ancar
    Bongiovanni
    Di Giovanna
    Anes
    Burhans
    Breihan
    Jayne
    Di Giovanni
    Eanes
    Ene

    Story Highlight

    THE FIRST THOMAS JOHN FAMILY REUNION

    JANUARY 29, 1883, AT HIS HOME PORTAGE, UTAH A few days ago William John, James John, Levi John, Joseph B. Hawkley, and William H. Gibbs met at Brother Wm. H. Gibbs' home for thepurpose of making arra …

    Sources (56)

    • Thomas Johns, "United States Census, 1870"
    • Thomas John in entry for Henry John, "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1964"
    • Thomas John, "United States Census, 1880"

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