John James Smith

7 August 1838–15 September 1915 (Age 77)
Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States

The Life Summary of John James

When John James Smith was born on 7 August 1838, in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States, his father, Jackson Osbourn Smith, was 23 and his mother, Mary Marie Owens, was 19. He married Eliza Margaret Robbins about 1864, in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States. They were the parents of at least 5 sons and 2 daughters. He lived in Millard, Utah, United States in 1880 and Charleston, Wasatch, Utah, United States in 1900. He died on 15 September 1915, in Daniel, Wasatch, Utah, United States, at the age of 77, and was buried in Heber City Cemetery, Heber City, Wasatch, Utah, United States.

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Family Time Line

John James Smith
1838–1915
Eliza Margaret Robbins
1844–1926
Marriage: about 1864
Oliver Jackson Smith
1870–1880
Lydia Ann Smith
1872–1938
Armenia Smith
1880–
Joseph Hyrum Smith
1873–1943
William Isaac Bill Smith
1878–1950
Francis Philemon Smith
1879–1939
Raymond Smith
1884–

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    about 1864Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States
  • Children

    (7)

    +2 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings

    (13)

    +8 More Children

    World Events (8)

    1839 · Nauvoo is Settled
    Age 1
    After the Saints had been chased out of Missouri they moved to a swampy area located next to the Mississippi River. Here they settled and named the place Nauvoo which translates into the city beautiful.
    1846
    Age 8
    U.S. acquires vast tracts of Mexican territory in wake of Mexican War including California and New Mexico.
    1861 · Simple life to Soldiers
    Age 23
    Illinois contributed 250,000 soldiers to the Union Army, ranking it fourth in terms of the total men fighting for a single state. Troops mainly fought in the Western side of the Appalachian Mountains, but a few regiments played important roles in the East side. Several thousand Illinoisians died during the war. No major battles were fought in the state, although several towns became sites for important supply depots and navy yards. Not everyone in the state supported the war and there were calls for secession in Southern Illinois several residents. However, the movement for secession soon died after the proposal was blocked.

    Name Meaning

    English and Scottish: occupational name denoting a worker in metal, especially iron, such as a blacksmith or farrier, from Middle English smith ‘smith’ (Old English smith, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Early examples are also found in the Latin form Faber . Metal-working was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents in other languages were the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is also the most frequent of all surnames in the US. It is very common among African Americans and Native Americans (see also 5 below). This surname (in any of the two possible English senses; see also below) is also found in Haiti. See also Smither .English: from Middle English smithe ‘smithy, forge’ (Old English smiththe). The surname may be topographic, for someone who lived in or by a blacksmith's shop, occupational, for someone who worked in one, or habitational, from a place so named, such as Smitha in King's Nympton (Devon). Compare Smithey .Irish and Scottish: sometimes adopted for Gaelic Mac Gobhann, Irish Mac Gabhann ‘son of the smith’. See McGowan .

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

    Smithe
    Smither
    Smithey
    Smyth
    Smythe
    McGowan
    Smead
    Faber

    Sources (20)

    • John J Smith in household of Brigham Sweat, "United States Census, 1900"
    • John Smith in entry for Joseph Smith, "Utah, County Marriages, 1871-1941"
    • Not known in entry for Joseph H. Smith, "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1965"

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