Joseph Fielding Smith

Brief Life History of Joseph Fielding

When Joseph Fielding Smith was born on 13 November 1838, in Far West, Caldwell, Missouri, United States, his father, Hyrum Smith, was 38 and his mother, Mary Fielding, was 37. He married Levira Annette Clark Smith on 5 April 1859, in Salt Lake, Utah, United States. He lived in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States in 1839 and Salt Lake, Utah, United States in 1900. He died on 19 November 1918, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States, at the age of 80, and was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (46)

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Family Time Line

Joseph Fielding Smith
1838–1918
Julina Lambson
1849–1936
Marriage: 5 May 1866
Edward Arthur Smith
1859–1911
Mercy Josephine Smith
1867–1870
Mary Sophronia Smith
1869–1948
Donnette Smith
1872–1961
Joseph Fielding Smith
1876–1972
David Asael Smith
1879–1952
George Carlos Smith
1881–1931
Julina Clarissa Smith
1884–1923
Elias Wesley Smith Sr.
1886–1970
Emily Jane Smith
1888–1982
Rachel Smith
1890–1986
Edith Eleanor Smith
1894–1987
Marjorie Virginia Smith
1906–1994

Sources (169)

  • Joseph Smith, "United States Census, 1900"
  • Joseph F Smith, "Utah, County Marriages, 1871-1941"
  • Joseph Fielding Smith, "Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1964"

World Events (8)

1839 · From Swamp to Beautiful Place

By 1829 Venus, Illinois had grown sufficiently and in 1832 was one of the contenders for the new county seat. However, the honor was awarded to a nearby city, Carthage. In 1834 the name Venus was changed to Commerce because the settlers felt that the new name better suited their plans. But during late 1839, arriving members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints bought the small town of Commerce and in April 1840 it was renamed Nauvoo by Joseph Smith Jr., who led the Latter-Day Saints to Nauvoo to escape persecution in Missouri. The name Nauvoo is derived from the traditional Hebrew language. It is notable that by 1844 Nauvoo's population had swollen to around 12,000 residents, rivaling the size of Chicago at the time. After the Latter-Day Saints left the population settled down toward 2,000 people.

1839 · Nauvoo is Settled

After the Saints had been chased out of Missouri they moved to a swampy area located next to the Mississippi River. Here they settled and named the place Nauvoo which translates into the city beautiful.

1861 · Simple life to Soldiers

Illinois contributed 250,000 soldiers to the Union Army, ranking it fourth in terms of the total men fighting for a single state. Troops mainly fought in the Western side of the Appalachian Mountains, but a few regiments played important roles in the East side. Several thousand Illinoisians died during the war. No major battles were fought in the state, although several towns became sites for important supply depots and navy yards. Not everyone in the state supported the war and there were calls for secession in Southern Illinois several residents. However, the movement for secession soon died after the proposal was blocked.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish: occupational name denoting a worker in metal, especially iron, such as a blacksmith or farrier, from Middle English smith ‘smith’ (Old English smith, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Early examples are also found in the Latin form Faber . Metal-working was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents in other languages were the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is also the most frequent of all surnames in the US. It is very common among African Americans and Native Americans (see also 5 below). This surname (in any of the two possible English senses; see also below) is also found in Haiti. See also Smither .

English: from Middle English smithe ‘smithy, forge’ (Old English smiththe). The surname may be topographic, for someone who lived in or by a blacksmith's shop, occupational, for someone who worked in one, or habitational, from a place so named, such as Smitha in King's Nympton (Devon). Compare Smithey .

Irish and Scottish: sometimes adopted for Gaelic Mac Gobhann, Irish Mac Gabhann ‘son of the smith’. See McGowan .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Story Highlight

Joseph Fielding Smith

Serves mission to Sandwich Islands (Hawaii) 1854-1857 age 15-19. Serves mission to Great Britain 1860-1863 age 21-24. Special mission to Hawaii with Elders Ezra T. Benson and Lorenzo Snow 1864 age 25 …

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