Lawrence Max Bond

Brief Life History of Lawrence Max

When Lawrence Max Bond was born on 20 September 1920, in Roy, Weber, Utah, United States, his father, Lawrence Cleon Bond, was 25 and his mother, Martha Minerva Parkes, was 26. He married Bettie Elaine Blair on 15 January 1947, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. He immigrated to World in 1944. He died on 6 February 2006, in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States, at the age of 85, and was buried in Roy City Cemetery, Roy, Weber, Utah, United States.

Photos and Memories (1)

Do you know Lawrence Max? Do you have a story about him that you would like to share? Sign In or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

Lawrence Max Bond
1920–2006
Bettie Elaine Blair
1921–2012
Marriage: 15 January 1947

Sources (19)

  • Lawrence Max Bond, "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Church Census Records (Worldwide), 1914-1960"
  • Lawrence Max Bond, "Utah, World War II Draft Registration Cards,1940-1947"
  • Lawrence M Bond, "United States Social Security Death Index"

Spouse and Children

World Events (8)

1923 · The President Dies of a Heart Attack

Warrant G. Harding died of a heart attack in the Palace hotel in San Francisco.

1924 · The Egyptian Theater is Constructed

"After the Arlington Hotel burnt down in 1923, Harman and Louis Peery devised a plan to build a grand theater like the Grand Opera House but with moving pictures. It was constructed after the manner of other famous theaters that were Egyptian-themed. The first feature played there was a silent film titled, ""Wanderer of the Wasteland"" and was accompanied by the famous pipe organ named, ""The Mighty Wurlitzer"". In 1951 the theater was renovated so that more people would be able to enjoy the films shown there. The theater exists today but only as a community theater and performing arts house."

1944 · The G.I Bill

The G.I. Bill was a law that provided a range of benefits for returning World War II veterans that were on active duty during the war and weren't dishonorably discharged. The goal was to provide rewards for all World War II veterans. The act avoided life insurance policy payouts because of political distress caused after the end of World War I. But the Benefits that were included were: Dedicated payments of tuition and living expenses to attend high school, college or vocational/technical school, low-cost mortgages, low-interest loans to start a business, as well as one year of unemployment compensation. By the mid-1950s, around 7.8 million veterans used the G.I. Bill education benefits.

Name Meaning

English: status name for a peasant farmer or husbandman, Middle English bond(e), bounde, occasionally bande ‘bondman, customary tenant, serf’ (Old English bonda, bunda, reinforced by Old Norse bóndi). The Old Norse word was also in use as a personal name (Old Norse Bóndi, Bondi, Bundi, Bonde, borrowed as late Old English Bonda), and this has given rise to other English and Scandinavian surnames alongside those originating as status names, such as the Middle English personal name Bonde. The status of the peasant farmer fluctuated considerably during the Middle Ages; moreover, the underlying ancient Germanic word is of disputed origin and meaning. Among ancient Germanic peoples who settled to an agricultural life, the term came to signify a farmer holding lands from, and bound by loyalty to, a lord; from this developed the sense of a free landholder as opposed to a serf. In England after the Norman Conquest the word sank in status and became associated with the notion of bound servitude. The name can also be a variant of Band .

Swedish: variant of Bonde .

In some cases also an American shortened form of Ukrainian Bondarenko and possibly also of some other surname beginning with Bond-.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Discover Even More

As a nonprofit, we offer free help to those looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a FREE Account

Search for Another Deceased Ancestor

Share this with your family and friends.