William Clark

Maleabout 1859–

Brief Life History of William

When William Clark was born about 1859, in Livingston, New York, United States, his father, Rodman Clark, was 37 and his mother, Emily Jane Hayward, was 30.

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Family Time Line

Rodman Clark
1823–1907
Emily Jane Hayward
1830–1907
Holloway Joseph Clark
1856–1907
William Clark
about 1859–

Sources (4)

  • Wm Clark in household of Christo Clark, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Legacy NFS Source: William Clark - Government record: Census record: birth: about 1859; Livingston, New York, United States
  • 1870 United States Federal Census

Parents and Siblings

Siblings (2)

World Events (3)

1863

Age 4

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

1863 · The Battle at Gettysburg

Age 4

The Battle of Gettysburg involved the largest number of casualties of the entire Civil war and is often described as the war's turning point. Between 46,000 and 51,000 soldiers lost their lives during the three-day Battle. To honor the fallen soldiers, President Abraham Lincoln read his historic Gettysburg Address and helped those listening by redefining the purpose of the war.

1917 · Women Given the Right to Vote in New York

Age 58

Voters in New York approve a bill giving women the right to vote. This is passed three years prior to the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution which allowed women to vote nationwide.

Name Meaning

English: from Middle English clerk, clark ‘clerk, cleric, writer’ (Old French clerc; see Clerc ). The original sense was ‘man in a religious order, cleric, clergyman’. As all writing and secretarial work in medieval Christian Europe was normally done by members of the clergy, the term clerk came to mean ‘scholar, secretary, recorder, or penman’ as well as ‘cleric’. As a surname, it was particularly common for one who had taken only minor holy orders. In medieval Christian Europe, clergy in minor orders were permitted to marry and so found families; thus the surname could become established.

Irish (Westmeath, Mayo): in Ireland the English surname was frequently adopted, partly by translation for Ó Cléirigh; see Cleary .

Americanized form of Dutch De Klerk or Flemish De Clerck or of variants of these names, and possibly also of French Clerc . Compare Clerk 2 and De Clark .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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