John Black

Brief Life History of John

When John Black was born on 11 October 1796, in Lewisburg, Union, Pennsylvania, United States, his father, James Black, was 34 and his mother, Isabella Laird, was 38. He married Jane Egbert on 9 January 1823, in Lewisburg, Union, Pennsylvania, United States. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 1 daughter. He lived in Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio, United States in 1850 and Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States in 1860. He died on 11 January 1886, in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States, at the age of 89, and was buried in Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.

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Family Time Line

John Black
1796–1886
Jane Egbert
1802–1869
Marriage: 9 January 1823
William Black
1821–1918
James Balfores Black, Prohibitionist
1823–1893
Cyrus Black
1828–1872
Thomas Simpson Black
1833–1889
Reuben Black
1834–1924
Isadore Jane Black
1837–1879
John Black Jr.
1842–1915

Sources (15)

  • John Black, "United States Census, 1880"
  • Ireland, Select Marriages, 1619-1898
  • John Black, "Find A Grave Index"

World Events (8)

1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

1812 · Harrisburg Becomes the State Capital

Harrisburg had important parts with migration, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. 

1820 · Making States Equal

The Missouri Compromise helped provide the entrance of Maine as a free state and Missouri as a slave state into the United States. As part of the compromise, slavery was prohibited north of the 36°30′ parallel, excluding Missouri.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish: chiefly from Middle English blak(e) ‘black’ (Old English blæc, blaca), a nickname given from the earliest times to a swarthy or dark-haired man. However, Middle English blac also meant ‘pale, wan’, a reflex of Old English blāc ‘pale, white’ with a shortened vowel. Compare Blatch and Blick . With rare exceptions it is impossible to disambiguate these antithetical senses in Middle English surnames. The same difficulty arises with Blake and Block .

Scottish: in Gaelic-speaking areas this name was adopted as a translation of the epithet dubh ‘dark, black-(haired)’, or of various other names based on Gaelic dubh ‘black’, see Duff .

Americanized form (translation into English) of various European surnames directly or indirectly derived from the adjective meaning ‘black, dark’, for example German and Jewish Schwarz and Slavic surnames beginning with Čern-, Chern- (see Chern and Cherne ), Chorn-, Crn- or Czern-.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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