Elizabeth Chapman

Brief Life History of Elizabeth

Elizabeth Chapman was born about 1824, in South Carolina, United States as the daughter of Robert Chapman. She married Jones Henderson Ewing on 29 January 1841, in Newton, Georgia, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son and 2 daughters. She died about 1851, in Newton, Georgia, United States, at the age of 29.

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Family Time Line

Jones Henderson Ewing
1821–1876
Elizabeth Chapman
1824–1851
Marriage: 29 January 1841
Miles Elmore Ewing
1846–1921
Elizabeth Ewing
1846–1926
Mary Frances "Fannie" Ewing
1847–1917

Sources (6)

  • Eliza Chapman, "Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950"
  • Chapman in entry for Elizebeth E. Bramblett, "Georgia Deaths, 1914-1927"
  • Eliza Chapman, "Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967"

World Events (5)

1825 · The Crimes Act

The Crimes Act was made to provide a clearer punishment of certain crimes against the United States. Part of it includes: Changing the maximum sentence of imprisonment to be increased from seven to ten years and changing the maximum fine from $5,000 to $10,000.

1829 · Fort Sumter Constructed

In 1829 Fort Sumter is constructed in the Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Fort Sumter is most known for being the site of the first shots of the Civil War. It is barely ready when the American Civil War starts.

1832 · The Black Hawk War

Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a merchant or trader, Middle English chap(pe)man, chepman, Old English cēapmann, cēpemann, a compound of cēap ‘barter, bargain, price, property’ + mann ‘man’.

Jewish: adopted probably for a like-sounding or like-meaning name in some other European language; see for example Kaufman .

History: This name was brought independently to North America from England by numerous different bearers from the 17th century onward. John Chapmen (sic) was one of the free planters who assented to the ‘Fundamental Agreement’ of the New Haven Colony on June 4, 1639.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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