Conrad Breneisa

Brief Life History of Conrad

When Conrad Breneisa was born on 27 February 1796, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States, his father, Daniel Brenneisen, was 27 and his mother, Elizabeth Meixel, was 22. He married Elizabeth Frey on 7 January 1819. They were the parents of at least 4 sons and 1 daughter. He died on 20 September 1876, in Warwick Township, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States, at the age of 80, and was buried in Lititz, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.

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Family Time Line

Conrad Breneisa
1796–1876
Elizabeth Frey
1797–1854
Marriage: 7 January 1819
Israel Breneisen
1820–1889
Johannes Breneisen
1823–
Daniel F. Breneisa
1827–1899
Elizabeth Breneisen
1833–1833
Ephraim Breneisen
1838–1841

Sources (5)

  • Conrad Breneisen, "United States Census, 1850"
  • Conrad Breneisen, "Pennsylvania Deaths and Burials, 1720-1999"
  • Conrad Breneisen, "Pennsylvania Cemetery Records, ca. 1700-ca. 1950"

Parents and Siblings

World Events (7)

1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

1812 · Harrisburg Becomes the State Capital

Harrisburg had important parts with migration, the Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. 

1819 · Panic! of 1819

With the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars the global market for trade was down. During this time, America had its first financial crisis and it lasted for only two years. 

Name Meaning

The usual English spelling of Konrad, a Germanic personal name derived from kuon ‘bold’ + rad ‘counsel’. It was used occasionally in Britain in the Middle Ages in honour of a 10th-century bishop of Constance, but modern use in the English-speaking world is a reimportation from Germany dating mainly from the 19th century.

Dictionary of First Names © Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges 1990, 2003, 2006.

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