Hannah Clark

Female3 March 1794–

Brief Life History of Hannah

When Hannah Clark was christened on 3 March 1794, in Phippsburg, Sagadahoc, Maine, United States, her father, Cutting Clark, was 40 and her mother, Lucy Carver, was 30.

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Family Time Line

Cutting Clark
1754–1825
Lucy Carver
1764–1855
Betsy Clark
1786–1850
Hannah Clark
1788–1820
William Clark
1790–
Samuel Clark
1792–1845
Betsey Clark
1794–
Hannah Clark
1794–
Samuel Phips Clark
1794–
William Clark
1794–
John Clark
1794–1877
Lucy Clark
1796–1863
Lydia Felch Clark
1798–1836
Mary Clark
1800–1819
Louisa Clark
1804–1895
Thomas Greene Clark
1808–1866

Sources (1)

  • Hannah Clark, "Maine, Births and Christenings, 1739-1900"

Parents and Siblings

Siblings (14)

+9 More Children

World Events (3)

1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

1803

France sells Louisiana territories to U.S.A.

1814

Historical Boundaries: 1814: Lincoln, Massachusetts, United States 1820: Lincoln, Maine, United States 1854: Sagadahoc, Maine, United States

Name Meaning

English: from Middle English clerk, clark ‘clerk, cleric, writer’ (Old French clerc; see Clerc ). The original sense was ‘man in a religious order, cleric, clergyman’. As all writing and secretarial work in medieval Christian Europe was normally done by members of the clergy, the term clerk came to mean ‘scholar, secretary, recorder, or penman’ as well as ‘cleric’. As a surname, it was particularly common for one who had taken only minor holy orders. In medieval Christian Europe, clergy in minor orders were permitted to marry and so found families; thus the surname could become established.

Irish (Westmeath, Mayo): in Ireland the English surname was frequently adopted, partly by translation for Ó Cléirigh; see Cleary .

Americanized form of Dutch De Klerk or Flemish De Clerck or of variants of these names, and possibly also of French Clerc . Compare Clerk 2 and De Clark .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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