Elliott Collins Burr

Brief Life History of Elliott Collins

When Elliott Collins Burr was born on 23 May 1821, in Kingsboro, Gloversville, Fulton, New York, United States, his father, Elijah F Burr, was 53 and his mother, Mary "Polly" Hall, was 51. He died on 6 December 1860, in Cuba, Allegany, New York, United States, at the age of 39, and was buried in Cuba Cemetery, Cuba, Cuba, Allegany, New York, United States.

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Family Time Line

Elijah F Burr
1768–1828
Mary "Polly" Hall
1770–1852
Elisha S. Burr
1798–1827
Mary L Burr
1802–1823
Eliah J. Burr
1808–1856
Eli Remus Burr
1804–1842
Mala Philena Burr
1808–1866
Elias Gilbert Burr
1808–1850
Elliott Collins Burr
1821–1860

Sources (2)

  • Collins E Burr, "New York State Census, 1855"
  • E. Collins Burr, "Find a Grave Index"

World Events (6)

1825 · The Crimes Act

The Crimes Act was made to provide a clearer punishment of certain crimes against the United States. Part of it includes: Changing the maximum sentence of imprisonment to be increased from seven to ten years and changing the maximum fine from $5,000 to $10,000.

1827 · Slavery Becomes Illegal in New York State

During the years 1799 to 1827, New York went through a period of gradual emancipation. A Gradual Emancipation Law was passed in 1799 which freed slave children born after July 4, 1799. However, they were indentured until 25 years old for women and 28 years old for men. A law passed 1817 which freed slaves born before 1799, yet delayed their emancipation for ten years. All remaining slaves were freed in New York State on July 4, 1827.

1832 · The Black Hawk War

Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.

Name Meaning

English: nickname from Middle English burre ‘bur’ (a seed-case or flower-head with clinging prickles), used by Shakespeare to denote someone who sticks like a bur, a person difficult to ‘shake off’, a sense which may well be older.

German: topographic name from Burr(e) ‘mound, hill’, or in the south a variant of Burrer .

History: The American political leader Aaron Burr (1756–1836) was the son of a clergyman and academic, president of Princeton University. On his mother's side he was descended from the Puritan preacher Jonathan Edwards; on his father's from Jehu Burr, who emigrated from England to MA with John Winthrop (see Winthrop ) in 1630.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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