Theresa Smith

13 December 1782–3 May 1855 (Age 72)
Connecticut, United States

The Life of Theresa

Theresa Smith was born on 13 December 1782, in Connecticut, United States. She had at least 2 sons and 2 daughters with Joshua Maxson. She lived in Hiram, Portage, Ohio, United States in 1850. She died on 3 May 1855, in Ohio, United States, at the age of 72, and was buried in Garrettsville, Portage, Ohio, United States.

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Family Time Line

Joshua Maxson
1780–1864
Theresa Smith
1782–1855
William Maxson
1814–1876
Laura Maxson
–1895
Henry Maxon
1818–
Caroline E Maxson
1823–1905

Spouse and Children

children

(4)

    Male1814–1876Male

    Henry Maxon

    Male1818–Male

    Caroline E Maxson

    Female1823–1905Female

    Female–1895Female

World Events (8)

1783 · A Free America

Age 1

The Revolutionary War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris which gave the new nation boundries on which they could expand and trade with other countries without any problems.
1788 · Connecticut Becomes the 5th State

Age 6

Connecticut became a state on January 9, 1788. In 1650, before it was a state, the boundary of Connecticut ran north from the westside of Greenwich Bay and the coast of the Pacific Ocean. During the 1600s, Westmoreland County was in Connecticut when the boundaries were changed Westmoreland County went to Pennsylvania.
1802 · Brass is Discovered

Age 20

"In 1802, brass was identified in Waterbury, Connecticut. This gave the city the nickname ""The Brass City."" Brass dominated the city and helped to create the city. The motto of the city is Quid Aere Perennius, which means What is more lasting than brass? in Latin."

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a worker in metal, from Middle English smith (Old English smið, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Metalworking was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents were perhaps the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is the most frequent of all American surnames; it has also absorbed, by assimilation and translation, cognates and equivalents from many other languages (for forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 ).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (2)

  • Theresa Maxon in household of Joshua Maxon, "United States Census, 1850"
  • Theresa Smith Maxson, "Find A Grave Index"

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