Celia Hall

1800–1836 (Age 36)
South Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States

The Life of Celia

When Celia Hall was born on 25 June 1800, in South Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States, her father, Col Alpheas Hall, was 43 and her mother, Mercy Blinn, was 37. She married James Dougherty on 11 November 1832, in South Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States. They were the parents of at least 2 daughters. She died on 15 November 1836, in Johnson, Lamoille, Vermont, United States, at the age of 36, and was buried in Johnson, Lamoille, Vermont, United States.

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Family Time Line

Celia Hall
1800–1836
James Dougherty
1796–1878
Marriage: 11 November 1832
Sarah Curran Dougherty
1834–1861
Isabella Celia Dougherty
1836–1894

Spouse & Children

  • Female1800–1836Female

  • James Dougherty

    Male1796–1878Male

MARRIAGE
11 November 1832
South Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States
children

(2)

Parents & Siblings

siblings

(12)

+7 More Children

World Events (8)

1803

Age 3

France sells Louisiana territories to U.S.A.
1803 · The U.S doubles in size

Age 3

The United States purchased all the Louisiana territory (828,000 sq. mi) from France, only paying 15 million dollars (A quarter trillion today) for the land. In the purchase, the US obtained the land that makes up 15 US states and 2 Canadian Provinces. The United States originally wanted to purchase of New Orleans and the lands located on the coast around it, but quickly accepted the bargain that Napoleon Bonaparte offered.
1812

Age 12

War of 1812. U.S. declares war on Britain over British interference with American maritime shipping and westward expansion.

Name Meaning

English, Scottish, Irish, German, and Scandinavian: from Middle English hall (Old English heall), Middle High German halle, Old Norse hōll all meaning ‘hall’ (a spacious residence), hence a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a hall or an occupational name for a servant employed at a hall. In some cases it may be a habitational name from places named with this word, which in some parts of Germany and Austria in the Middle Ages also denoted a salt mine. The English name has been established in Ireland since the Middle Ages, and, according to MacLysaght, has become numerous in Ulster since the 17th century.

Possible Related Names

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Sources (3)

  • Celia Hall Dougherty, "Vermont Vital Records, 1760-1954"
  • Celia Dougherty, "Vermont Vital Records, 1760-1954"
  • Celia Hall in entry for Isabelle Celia Dougherty, "Vermont Vital Records, 1760-1954"

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