Josiah Ivy Wright

1825–1907 (Age 82)
Tennessee, United States

The Life of Josiah Ivy

When Josiah Ivy Wright was born in 1825, in Tennessee, United States, his father, Josiah Wright, was 27 and his mother, Nancy Asbury Reynolds, was 25. He married Susannah White in 1853. They were the parents of at least 2 sons and 1 daughter. He lived in Rome, Floyd, Georgia, United States in 1870 and DeSoto, Floyd, Georgia, United States in 1880. He died in 1907, in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Texas, United States, at the age of 82, and was buried in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Texas, United States.

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Family Time Line

Josiah Ivy Wright
1825–1907
Susannah White
1826–1897
Marriage: 1853
James Oliver Wright
1854–1907
Thomas Young Wright
1856–1904
Jennie N Wright
1861–

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
1853
children

(3)

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(5)

World Events (8)

1825 · The Crimes Act

Age 0

The Crimes Act was made to provide a clearer punishment of certain crimes against the United States. Part of it includes: Changing the maximum sentence of imprisonment to be increased from seven to ten years and changing the maximum fine from $5,000 to $10,000.
1832 · Worcester v. Georgia

Age 7

In 1830, U.S. President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act which required all Native Americans to relocate to areas west of the Mississippi River. That same year, Governor Gilmer of Georgia signed an act which claimed for Georgia all Cherokee territories within the boundaries of Georgia. The Cherokees protested the act and the case made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The case, Worcester v. Georgia, ruled in 1832 that the United States, not Georgia, had rights over the Cherokee territories and Georgia laws regarding the Cherokee Nation were voided. President Jackson didn’t enforce the ruling and the Cherokees did not cede their land and Georgia held a land lottery anyway for white settlers.
1850 · Compromise of 1850

Age 25

The United States Congress passed a package of five separate bills in an attempt to decrease tensions between the slave states and free states. The compromise itself was received gratefully, but both sides disapproved of certain components contained in the laws. Texas was impacted in several ways; mainly, the state surrendered its claim to New Mexico (and other claims north of 36°30′) but retained the Texas Panhandle. The federal government also took over the public debt for Texas.

Name Meaning

1 English, Scottish, and northern Irish: occupational name for a maker of machinery, mostly in wood, of any of a wide range of kinds, from Old English wyrhta, wryhta ‘craftsman’ (a derivative of wyrcan ‘to work or make’). The term is found in various combinations (for example, Cartwright and Wainwright ), but when used in isolation it generally referred to a builder of windmills or watermills.2 Common New England Americanized form of French Le Droit, a nickname for an upright person, a man of probity, from Old French droit ‘right’, in which there has been confusion between the homophones right and wright.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Jos I Wright, "United States Census, 1870"
  • J I Wright, "United States Census, 1880"
  • Josiah J Wright, "United States Census, 1860"

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