Sarah J. Smith

20 November 1870–May 1879 (Age 8)
Genesee, Genesee, Michigan, United States

The Life of Sarah J.

When Sarah J. Smith was born on 20 November 1870, in Genesee, Genesee, Michigan, United States, her father, George H Smith, was 29 and her mother, Adelaide Augusta Smith, was 23. She died in May 1879, in Michigan, United States, at the age of 8.

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Family Time Line

George H Smith
1841–1917
Adelaide Augusta Smith
1847–1934
Mary Smith
1870–1924
Sarah J. Smith
1870–1879
Lulu Georgia Smith
1873–1962
Murry Roswell Smith
1884–1931

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(4)

World Events (3)

1872 · The First National Park

Age 2

Yellowstone National Park was given the title of the first national park by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant. It is also believed to be the first national park in the world.
1872 · The Amnesty Act

Age 2

A federal law which reversed most of the penalties on former Confederate soldiers by the Fourteenth Amendment. The Act affected over 150,000 troops that were a part of the Civil War.
1879 · New State Capitol Building Dedicated

Age 9

After the second state capitol had been destroyed, Michigan Governor Henry P. Baldwin initiated the passing of a bill that would cover the costs for a new building. The bill was adopted and raised over $1 million by a six year state income tax. Architect Elijah E. Myers' design named Tuebor, or I will defend, was selected and he was commissioned to design the new capitol building. The renaissance revival brick and sandstone building soared 267 feet from the ground and was dedicated on January 1, 1879.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a worker in metal, from Middle English smith (Old English smið, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Metalworking was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents were perhaps the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is the most frequent of all American surnames; it has also absorbed, by assimilation and translation, cognates and equivalents from many other languages (for forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988 ).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (2)

  • Sarah J. Smith, "Michigan Births, 1867-1902"
  • Sarah J. Smith, "Michigan, Births and Christenings, 1775-1995"

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