Margaret Clark

22 February 1812–26 November 1866 (Age 54)
Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States

The Life of Margaret

When Margaret Clark was born on 22 February 1812, in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States, her father, Sylvester Clark, was 25 and her mother, Lydia Cook, was 24. She died on 26 November 1866, in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States, at the age of 54, and was buried in Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States.

Photos & Memories (0)

Photos & Memories

Do you know this person? Do you have a story about her you would like to share? Sign in or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

Sylvester Clark
1786–1841
Lydia Cook
1788–1864
Margaret Clark
1812–1866
Joseph Cook Clark
1814–1882
Harriet Clark
1816–1818
Harriet Lucinda Clark
1818–1819
Caroline Clark
1819–1872
George Sylvester Clark
1822–1874
Lydia Ann Clark
1822–1914
Clarissa Alvord Clark
1824–
Miranda A. Clark
1827–1828
Miranda Edwards Clark
1829–1855

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(10)

+5 More Children

World Events (7)

1819 · Panic! of 1819

Age 7

With the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars the global market for trade was down. During this time, America had its first financial crisis and it lasted for only two years. 
1820 · Making States Equal

Age 8

The Missouri Compromise helped provide the entrance of Maine as a free state and Missouri as a slave state into the United States. As part of the compromise, slavery was prohibited north of the 36°30′ parallel, excluding Missouri.
1830 · The Second Great Awakening

Age 18

Being a second spiritual and religious awakening, like the First Great Awakening, many Churches began to spring up from other denominations. Many people began to rapidly join the Baptist and Methodist congregations. Many converts to these religions believed that the Awakening was the precursor of a new millennial age.

Name Meaning

English: occupational name for a scribe or secretary, originally a member of a minor religious order who undertook such duties. The word clerc denoted a member of a religious order, from Old English cler(e)c ‘priest’, reinforced by Old French clerc. Both are from Late Latin clericus, from Greek klērikos, a derivative of klēros ‘inheritance’, ‘legacy’, with reference to the priestly tribe of Levites ( see Levy ) ‘whose inheritance was the Lord’. In medieval Christian Europe, clergy in minor orders were permitted to marry and so found families; thus the surname could become established. In the Middle Ages it was virtually only members of religious orders who learned to read and write, so that the term clerk came to denote any literate man.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Margaret Clark, "Massachusetts Deaths, 1841-1915"
  • Margaret Clark, "Massachusetts, Springfield Vital Records, 1638-1887"
  • Margaret Clark, "Find A Grave Index"

Find more of your family story

As a non-profit, we offer free help to anyone looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a free account to view more about your family.
Create a free account
Share this with your family and friends.