James Horn

about 1705–
Dysart, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom

The Life of James

James Horn was born about 1705, in Dysart, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom as the son of Agnes Broun. He married Catharin Cunningam about 1730, in Dysart, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom. They were the parents of at least 5 sons and 2 daughters.

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Family Time Line

James Horn
1705–
Catharin Cunningam
1709–
Marriage: about 1730
Catharin Horn
1731–
Robert Horn
1732–
Thomas Horn
1734–
John Horn
1736–
Margaret HORN
1740–
Alexander Horn
1743–
James Horn
1751–

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
about 1730
Dysart, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom
children

(7)

+2 More Children

Parents and Siblings

    Agnes Broun

    Female1680–Female

siblings

(6)

    Male1684–Male

    Male1705–Male

    William Horn

    Male1708–Male

    Christian Horn

    Female1711–Female

    Christian Horn

    Male1712–Male

+1 More Child

World Events (2)

1802 · John Playfair publishes summary of James Hutton's theories of geology.

Age 97

In 1802, John Playfair published the Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth. His influence was by James Hutton’s knowledge of the earth’s geology.
1815

Age 110

The defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo marks the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Napoleon defeated and exiled to St. Helena.

Name Meaning

1 English, Scottish, German, and Dutch: from Middle English, Middle High German, Middle Dutch horn ‘horn’, applied in a variety of senses: as a metonymic occupational name for someone who made small articles, such as combs, spoons, and window lights, out of horn; as a metonymic occupational name for someone who played a musical instrument made from the horn of an animal; as a topographic name for someone who lived by a horn-shaped spur of a hill or tongue of land in a bend of a river, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this element (for example, in England, Horne in Surrey on a spur of a hill and Horn in Rutland in a bend of a river); as a nickname, perhaps referring to some feature of a person's physical appearance, or denoting a cuckolded husband.2 Norwegian: habitational name from any of several farmsteads so named, from Old Norse horn ‘horn’, ‘spur of land’.3 Swedish: ornamental or topographic name from horn ‘horn’, ‘spur of land’.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • James Horn in the Millennium File
  • James Horn, "Scotland, Marriages, 1561-1910"
  • James Horn, "Scotland, Marriages, 1561-1910"

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