Richard Blake Sr.

Brief Life History of Richard

When Richard Blake Sr. was born on 7 October 1747, in Middletown, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States, his father, Joseph Blake, was 34 and his mother, Rebeckah Higby, was 32. He married Damaris Smedley on 6 July 1769, in Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States. They were the parents of at least 6 sons and 4 daughters. He died on 17 July 1807, in Livonia, Livonia, Livingston, New York, United States, at the age of 59, and was buried in Union Cemetery, Livonia, Livonia, Livingston, New York, United States.

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Family Time Line

Richard Blake Sr.
1747–1807
Damaris Smedley
1747–1828
Marriage: 6 July 1769
James Blake
1769–1817
Jesse Blake
1773–1859
Reuel Blake
1774–1845
Rebecca Blake
1776–1855
Damaris Blake
1778–1839
Zara Blake
1781–1839
Pharis Blake
1781–1850
Uriel Blake
1786–1808
Concurrance Blake
1787–1846
Eunice Blake
1794–1847

Sources (23)

  • Richard Blake, "United States Census, 1840"
  • Richard Blake, "Connecticut, Births and Christenings, 1649-1906"
  • Richard Blake Sr, "Find A Grave Index"

Spouse and Children

World Events (6)

1776

Thomas Jefferson's American Declaration of Independence endorsed by Congress. Colonies declare independence.

1776

New York is the 11th state.

1781 · The First Constitution

Serving the newly created United States of America as the first constitution, the Articles of Confederation were an agreement among the 13 original states preserving the independence and sovereignty of the states. But with a limited central government, the Constitutional Convention came together to replace the Articles of Confederation with a more established Constitution and central government on where the states can be represented and voice their concerns and comments to build up the nation.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish (England and central Scotland): variant of Black 1, meaning ‘swarthy’ or ‘dark-haired’, from a byform of the Old English adjective blæc, blac ‘black’, with change of vowel length.

English: nickname from Middle English blak(e) (Old English blāc) ‘wan, pale, white, fair’. In Middle English the two words blac and blāc, with opposite meanings, fell together as Middle English blake. In the absence of independent evidence as to whether the person referred to was dark or fair, it is now impossible to tell which sense was originally meant.

English (Norfolk): nickname from Middle English bleik, blaik>, blek(e) (Old Norse bleikr) ‘pale or sallow’ (in complexion).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

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