Hannah Yeoman

Brief Life History of Hannah

When Hannah Yeoman was born in 1738, in Charlestown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States, her father, EZEKIAL Yeoman, was 21 and her mother, MARGARET, was 20. She married Thomas Clark on 8 December 1758, in Richmond Election Precinct, Snohomish, Washington, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son. She died in Lancaster, Camden District, South Carolina, United States.

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Family Time Line

Thomas Clark
1736–
Hannah Yeoman
1738–
Marriage: 8 December 1758
John Clark
1765–1844

Sources (1)

  • Hannah Yeoman, "Rhode Island, Marriages, 1724-1916"

Spouse and Children

Parents and Siblings

World Events (6)

1776

Thomas Jefferson's American Declaration of Independence endorsed by Congress. Colonies declare independence.

1776 · Rhode Island Declares Independence

Rhode Island declares independence from Great Britain on May 4, 1776, making it the first colony to do so officially.

1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish: status name, from Middle English yoman, yeman, used of an attendant of relatively high status in a noble household, ranking between a Sergeant and a Groom , or between a Squire and a Page . The word probably originated as a shortened form of Middle English yonge man. Later in the Middle English period it came to be used of a modest independent freeholder, and this latter sense may well lie behind some examples of the surname. In Scotland by the 16th century it had come to denote a landholder next in rank below a gentleman, specifically one who owned land worth at least forty shillings a year.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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