James Galpin Land

Brief Life History of James Galpin

When James Galpin Land was born on 26 July 1860, in Cleburne, Alabama, United States, his father, John William Land, was 27 and his mother, Elizabeth Jane Rutledge, was 23. He married Elizabeth Chandler on 1 January 1880, in Haralson, Georgia, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 daughters. He lived in Justice Precinct 2, San Saba, Texas, United States in 1900 and Ward Eight, Claiborne, Louisiana, United States in 1910. He died on 14 September 1929, in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Texas, United States, at the age of 69, and was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, United States.

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Family Time Line

James Galpin Land
1860–1929
Lillie Jane Wynn
1872–1943
Marriage: 8 August 1889
Marion Franklin Land
1888–1917
James Walter Land
1890–1965
Hattie Leoma Land
1893–1968
William Clifton Land
1894–1965
Sarah Ann Land
1896–1972
Jesse Lee Land
1898–1965
Dessie Mae Land
1900–1989
Gertrude Virgina Land
1902–1993
Annie Lou Land
1905–1994
Beulah Viola Land
1907–1981

Sources (24)

  • James G Land, "United States Census, 1920"
  • J G Land, "Alabama County Marriages, 1809-1950"
  • James G Land, "Find A Grave Index"

World Events (8)

1863

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

1870

Historical Boundaries: 1870: Cleburne, Alabama, United States

1881 · The Assassination of James Garfield

Garfield was shot twice by Charles J. Guitea at Railroad Station in Washington, D.C. on July 2, 1881. After eleven weeks of intensive and other care Garfield died in Elberon, New Jersey, the second of four presidents to be assassinated, following Abraham Lincoln.

Name Meaning

English, German, and Dutch: topographic name from Old English, Middle Dutch land, Middle High German lant ‘land, territory’. This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.

English: topographic name from Middle English launde ‘glade’ (Old French land), or a habitational name from a place called with this word, such as Launde in Leicestershire or Laund in Yorkshire.

Norwegian: habitational name from any of the three farmsteads so named, from Old Norse land ‘land, territory’ (see 1 above).

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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