Nicholas Coleman

May 1781–25 July 1851 (Age 70)
Somerset, Shaw Mines, Summit Township, Somerset, Pennsylvania, United States

The Life of Nicholas

When Nicholas Coleman was born in May 1781, in Somerset, Shaw Mines, Summit Township, Somerset, Pennsylvania, United States, his father, Johannes Nicholas Coleman, was 21 and his mother, Susanna Faust, was 22. He married Anna Mary Vance on 16 June 1808, in Preble, Ohio, United States. They were the parents of at least 1 son and 3 daughters. He lived in Brothersvalley Township, Somerset, Pennsylvania, United States for about 10 years and Twin Township, Preble, Ohio, United States in 1850. He died on 25 July 1851, in Preble, Ohio, United States, at the age of 70, and was buried in Lewisburg, Preble, Ohio, United States.

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Family Time Line

Nicholas Coleman
1781–1851
Anna Mary Vance
1789–1865
Marriage: 16 June 1808
Catharine Coleman
1809–1863
Sally Coleman
1811–1849
Susanna Coleman
1813–
John Coleman
1815–1894

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
16 June 1808
Preble, Ohio, United States
children

(4)

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(12)

+7 More Children

World Events (8)

1783 · A Free America

Age 2

The Revolutionary War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris which gave the new nation boundries on which they could expand and trade with other countries without any problems.
1786 · Shays' Rebellion

Age 5

Caused by war veteran Daniel Shays, Shays' Rebellion was to protest economic and civil rights injustices that he and other farmers were seeing after the Revolutionary War. Because of the Rebellion it opened the eyes of the governing officials that the Articles of Confederation needed a reform. The Rebellion served as a guardrail when helping reform the United States Constitution.
1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

Age 19

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

Name Meaning

1 Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Colmáin ‘descendant of Colmán’. This was the name of an Irish missionary to Europe, generally known as St. Columban ( c.540–615 ), who founded the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy in 614 . With his companion St. Gall, he enjoyed a considerable cult throughout central Europe, so that forms of his name were adopted as personal names in Italian (Columbano), French (Colombain), Czech (Kollman), and Hungarian (Kálmán). From all of these surnames are derived. In Irish and English, the name of this saint is identical with diminutives of the name of the 6th-century missionary known in English as St. Columba ( 521–97 ), who converted the Picts to Christianity, and who was known in Scandinavian languages as Kalman.2 Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Clumháin ‘descendant of Clumhán’, a personal name from the diminutive of clúmh ‘down’, ‘feathers’.3 English: occupational name for a burner of charcoal or a gatherer of coal, Middle English coleman, from Old English col ‘(char)coal’ + mann ‘man’.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (3)

  • Nicholas Coleman, "United States Census, 1840"
  • Nicholas Colman, "United States Census, 1830"
  • Nicolas Coleman, "United States Census, 1850"

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