John Manville Scott

Brief Life History of John Manville

When John Manville Scott was born on 24 August 1796, in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States, his father, Adjoniah Scott, was 31 and his mother, Elizabeth Manville, was 28. He married Mary Andrew on 17 January 1821, in Watertown, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States. They were the parents of at least 3 sons and 3 daughters. He died on 19 January 1853, at the age of 56, and was buried in Watertown, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.

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Family Time Line

John Manville Scott
1796–1853
Mary Andrew
1804–
Marriage: 17 January 1821
Henry George Scott
1823–1906
Emmeline E. Scott
1833–
Charles Scott
1827–
Elizabeth A. Scott
1830–
John Scott
1839–1843
Mary Ann Scott
1843–1885

Sources (4)

  • John Manville Scott, "Find A Grave Index"
  • Scott John M, "Connecticut, Vital Records, Prior to 1850"
  • John M Scott, "Connecticut, Vital Records, Prior to 1850"

World Events (8)

1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

1802 · Brass is Discovered

"In 1802, brass was identified in Waterbury, Connecticut. This gave the city the nickname ""The Brass City."" Brass dominated the city and helped to create the city. The motto of the city is Quid Aere Perennius, which means What is more lasting than brass? in Latin."

1812

War of 1812. U.S. declares war on Britain over British interference with American maritime shipping and westward expansion.

Name Meaning

English, Scottish, and Irish (Down): habitational and ethnic name from Middle English Scot ‘man from Scotland’. There is no evidence that the surname denoted either of the earlier senses of Scot as ‘(Gaelic-speaking) Irishman’ or ‘man from Alba’, the Gaelic-speaking region of Scotland north of the river Forth. This surname is also very common among African Americans.

English and Scottish: from the rare Middle English personal name Scot (Old English Scott, possibly also Old Norse Skotr), only certainly attested in northern England.

English: variant of Scutt .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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