Esther C. Walker

Brief Life History of Esther C.

When Esther C. Walker was born in March 1831, in Hubbardton, Rutland, Vermont, United States, her father, Benjamin Walker, was 41 and her mother, Anna B. Lindsey, was 41. She married Milo Easton on 23 November 1858, in Hubbardton, Rutland, Vermont, United States. She lived in Harrison Township, Franklin, Kansas, United States in 1880 and Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States in 1900.

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Family Time Line

Ansel L. Hill
1835–1902
Esther C. Walker
1831–
Marriage: 25 December 1890

Sources (13)

  • Esther Galt in household of Daniel Galt, "United States Census, 1870"
  • Ester A Walker, "Vermont, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1732-2005"
  • Esther C Gault in household of D E Gault, "United States Census, 1880"

Spouse and Children

World Events (8)

1832 · Black Hawk War

"The Black Hawk War was a brief conflict between the United States and Native Americans led by Black Hawk, a Sauk leader. The war erupted soon after Black Hawk and a group of other tribes, known as the ""British Band"", crossed the Mississippi River, into Illinois, from Iowa Indian Territory in April 1832. Black Hawk's motives were ambiguous, but records show that he was hoping to avoid bloodshed while resettling on tribal land that had been given to the United States in the 1804 Treaty of St. Louis."

1832 · The Black Hawk War

Convinced that a group of Native American tribes were hostile, The United States formed a frontier militia to stop them in their tracks. Even though Black Hawk was hoping to avoid bloodshed while trying to resettle on tribal land, U.S. officials opened fire on the Native Americans. Black Hawk then responded to this confrontation by successfully attacking the militia at the Battle of Stillman's Run and then left northward. After a few months the militia caught up with Black Hawk and his men and defeated them at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights. While being weakened by hunger, injuries and desertion, Black Hawk and the rest of the many native survivors retreated towards the Mississippi. Unfortunately, Black Hawk and other leaders were later captured when they surrendered to the US forces and were then imprisoned for a year.

1863

Abraham Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, declaring slaves in Confederate states to be free.

Name Meaning

English (mainly North and Midlands) and Scottish: occupational name for a fuller, from Middle English walker, Old English wealcere (an agent derivative of wealcan ‘to walk, tread’), ‘one who trampled cloth in a bath of lye or kneaded it, in order to strengthen it’. This was the regular term for the occupation during the Middle Ages in western and northern England. Compare Fuller and Tucker . As a Scottish surname it has also been used as a translation of Gaelic Mac an Fhucadair ‘son of the fuller’. This surname is also very common among African Americans.

History: The name was brought to North America from northern England and Scotland independently by many different bearers in the 17th and 18th centuries. Samuel Walker came to Lynn, MA, c. 1630; Philip Walker was in Rehoboth, MA, in or before 1643. The surname was also established in VA before 1650; a Thomas Walker, born in 1715 in King and Queen County, VA, was a physician, soldier, and explorer.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

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