Sarah Anderson

Female1753–1810

Brief Life History of Sarah

Sarah Anderson was born in 1753, in Orange, North Carolina, British Colonial America as the daughter of James W Anderson. She married Richard Anderson Winningham in 1775. They were the parents of at least 9 sons and 3 daughters. She died in 1810, in Tennessee, United States, at the age of 57, and was buried in Tennessee, United States.

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Family Time Line

Richard Anderson Winningham
1758–1806
Sarah Anderson
1753–1810
Marriage: 1775
Richard Anderson Winningham
1777–1870
Isabel Winningham
about 1782–1861
Colbert Winningham
1798–
Abraham Winningham
1780–1840
Adam Winningham
1781–1859
Abel Winningham
1790–
Twin One Winningham
1793–
Twin Two Winningham
1793–
James G. Winningham
1794–1827
WINNINGHAM
1798–
David Winningham Sr.
1799–1880
John Winningham
1800–1844

Sources (2)

  • Global, Find A Grave Index for Burials at Sea and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current
  • U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current

Spouse and Children

  • Marriage
    1775
  • Children (12)

    +7 More Children

    Parents and Siblings

    Siblings (1)

    World Events (7)

    1767 · Tryon Palace

    Age 14

    Built on August 26, 1767, the Tryon Palace became the capitol building for North Carolina. The building was named after William Tryon a British officer and colonial official.

    1774 · Edenton Tea Party

    Age 21

    On October 25, 1774, the Edenton Tea Party took place. It was the first organized women's protest. They put their cups down and refused to buy any tea.

    1775

    Age 22

    Many people believe that North Carolina was the first state to declare independence from England with the Mecklenburg Declaration of 1775.

    Name Meaning

    Scottish and northern English: patronymic from the personal name Ander(s), a northern Middle English form of Andrew , + son ‘son’. The frequency of the surname in Scotland is attributable, at least in part, to the fact that Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, so the personal name has long enjoyed great popularity there. Legend has it that the saint's relics were taken to Scotland in the 4th century by a certain Saint Regulus. In North America, this surname has absorbed many cognate or like-sounding surnames in other languages, notably Scandinavian (see 3 and 4 below), but also Ukrainian Andreychenko etc.

    German: patronymic from the personal name Anders , hence a cognate of 1 above.

    Americanized form (and a less common Swedish variant) of Swedish Andersson , a cognate of 1 above.

    Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

    Possible Related Names

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