Rebecca Purcell

19 January 1815–28 August 1859 (Age 44)
Hunterdon, New Jersey, United States

The Life of Rebecca

When Rebecca Purcell was born on 19 January 1815, in Hunterdon, New Jersey, United States, her father, John Purcell, was 46 and her mother, Mary Haughawout, was 44. She died on 28 August 1859, in Greenwich Township, Warren, New Jersey, United States, at the age of 44.

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Family Time Line

John Purcell
1768–1850
Mary Haughawout
1771–1857
Jonathan Pursel
1788–1854
Leah Purcell
1789–1858
Lefferd H. Pursell
1791–1870
John Purcell
1793–1860
Daniel Haughawout Purcell
1795–1860
Peter Purcel
1796–1875
William Pursell
1798–1865
Sarah Purcell
1801–1876
Ester Pursell
1803–
Jacob Pursel
1804–1880
Charles Purcell
1807–1852
Eli Pursel
1810–1870
Mary Purcell
1813–1859
Rebecca Purcell
1815–1859

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(14)

+9 More Children

World Events (6)

1819 · Panic! of 1819

Age 4

With the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars the global market for trade was down. During this time, America had its first financial crisis and it lasted for only two years. 
1820

Age 5

On January 28, 1820, the New Jersey Legislature incorporated the City of Jersey from parts of the Bergen Township. The city would be reincorporated two more times (January 23, 1829 and February 22, 1838) before receiving its official name. Jersey City became part of the new Hudson County in February of 1840.
1830 · The Second Great Awakening

Age 15

Being a second spiritual and religious awakening, like the First Great Awakening, many Churches began to spring up from other denominations. Many people began to rapidly join the Baptist and Methodist congregations. Many converts to these religions believed that the Awakening was the precursor of a new millennial age.

Name Meaning

English, Welsh, and Irish (of Norman origin): from Old French pourcel ‘piglet’ (Latin porcellus, a diminutive of porcus ‘pig’), hence a metonymic occupational name for a swineherd, or a nickname, perhaps affectionate in tone. This is a common surname in Ireland, having become established there in the 12th century.

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Sources (1)

  • Legacy NFS Source: Rebecca Purcell -

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