Isaac Smith

Brief Life History of Isaac

When Isaac Smith was born in 1718, in Horsley, Gloucestershire, England, his father, Will. Smith, was 29 and his mother, Elizabeth, was 19. He married Susannah Tainton on 8 October 1745, in Bisley, Gloucestershire, England. They were the parents of at least 4 sons and 1 daughter. He died on 27 December 1783, in his hometown, at the age of 65, and was buried in Horsley, Gloucestershire, England.

Photos and Memories (0)

Photos and Memories

Do you know Isaac? Do you have a story about him that you would like to share? Sign In or Create a FREE Account

Family Time Line

Isaac Smith
1718–1783
Susannah Tainton
1720–1799
Marriage: 8 October 1745
Deborah Smith
1746–
Isaac Smith
1748–
Thomas Smith
1751–1816
William Smith
1759–1830
Richard Smith
1768–

Sources (11)

  • Isaac Smith birth record in England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975
  • Isaac Smith, "England Marriages, 1538–1973"
  • Isaac Smith in entry for Martha Smith, "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975"

Parents and Siblings

World Events (5)

1720 · South Sea Bubble

The South Sea Bubble Bill was passed by the House of Lords in 1720. This allowed the South Sea company to monopolize trade with South America. The company underwrote the English National Debt which promised 5% interest from the government. As shares rose exponentially, many companies were created and many fortunes were made. The stocks crashed and many people lost their money which caused them to become destitute overnight and suicide was common. Robert Walpole took charge of the South Sea Bubble Financial Crisis by dividing the national debt between the Bank of England, the Treasury, and the Sinking Fund.

1752 · Gregorian Calendar is Adopted

Gregorian calendar was adopted in England in 1752. That year, Wednesday, September 2, 1752, was followed by Thursday, September 14th, 1752, which caused the country to skip ahead eleven days.

1754 · Seven Years' War

The Seven Years' War began as a North American conflict then stretched between England and France. England, along with allies, battled France in America, India, and Europe, making it arguably the first global war. The conflict ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763 and England was victorious. The Seven Years' war ultimately led to discontent in the colonies and the American Revolution.

Name Meaning

English and Scottish: occupational name denoting a worker in metal, especially iron, such as a blacksmith or farrier, from Middle English smith ‘smith’ (Old English smith, probably a derivative of smītan ‘to strike, hammer’). Early examples are also found in the Latin form Faber . Metal-working was one of the earliest occupations for which specialist skills were required, and its importance ensured that this term and its equivalents in other languages were the most widespread of all occupational surnames in Europe. Medieval smiths were important not only in making horseshoes, plowshares, and other domestic articles, but above all for their skill in forging swords, other weapons, and armor. This is also the most frequent of all surnames in the US. It is very common among African Americans and Native Americans (see also 5 below). This surname (in any of the two possible English senses; see also below) is also found in Haiti. See also Smither .

English: from Middle English smithe ‘smithy, forge’ (Old English smiththe). The surname may be topographic, for someone who lived in or by a blacksmith's shop, occupational, for someone who worked in one, or habitational, from a place so named, such as Smitha in King's Nympton (Devon). Compare Smithey .

Irish and Scottish: sometimes adopted for Gaelic Mac Gobhann, Irish Mac Gabhann ‘son of the smith’. See McGowan .

Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006.

Possible Related Names

Discover Even More

As a nonprofit, we offer free help to those looking to learn the details of their family story.

Create a FREE Account

Search for Another Deceased Ancestor

Share this with your family and friends.