John B. Umberhind

Brief Life History of John B.

When John B. Umberhind was born on 25 January 1825, in Richmond, Sagadahoc, Maine, United States, his father, Charles Umberhind Jr., was 30 and his mother, Margaret A Benner, was 27. He married Hariet Ann Meserve about 1850. They were the parents of at least 1 daughter. He lived in Richmond, Lincoln, Maine, United States in 1850. He died on 6 May 1875, in Richmond, Sagadahoc, Maine, United States, at the age of 50, and was buried in Richmond, Sagadahoc, Maine, United States.

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Family Time Line

John B. Umberhind
1825–1875
Nancy Ann Small
1829–1901
Marriage: 11 February 1855
Isaac Franklin Umberhind
1855–1919
Harriet Ann Umberhind
1857–1864

Sources (24)

  • John B Umberhine, "United States Census, 1870"
  • John B. Umberkind, "Maine Marriages, 1771-1907"
  • John B Umberhine, "Find A Grave Index"

World Events (8)

1830 · The Second Great Awakening

Being a second spiritual and religious awakening, like the First Great Awakening, many Churches began to spring up from other denominations. Many people began to rapidly join the Baptist and Methodist congregations. Many converts to these religions believed that the Awakening was the precursor of a new millennial age.

1832 · Calais Branch is Chartered

The State of Maine chartered the Calais Railway in 1832, one of the first railway charters to be granted by the state. Construction was very long, as the project was reorganized, abandoned, transferred to other companies, and extended several times. It was finally completed in 1898.

1842 · Webster–Ashburton Treaty

The Webster-Ashburton Treaty was signed on August 9, 1842 and resolved the border issues between the United States and British North American colonies which had caused the Aroostook War. The treaty contained several agreements and concessions. It called for an end on the overseas slave trade and proposed that both parties share the Great Lakes. It also reaffirmed the location of the westward frontier border (near the Rocky Mountains) as well as the border between Lake Superior and Lake of the Woods. The treaty was signed by Daniel Webster (United States Secretary of State) and Alexander Baring (British Diplomat, 1st Baron Ashburton).

Name Meaning

Contracted form of Old French Jo(h)anne, from Latin Io(h)anna ( see Joanna ). In England this was the usual feminine form of John from the Middle English period onwards and was extremely popular, but in the 16th and 17th centuries it steadily lost ground to Jane . It was strongly revived in the first part of the 20th century, partly under the influence of George Bernard Shaw's play St Joan ( 1923 ), based on the life of Joan of Arc ( 1412–31 ). Claiming to be guided by the voices of the saints, she persuaded the French dauphin to defy the occupying English forces and have himself crowned, and she led the French army that raised the siege of Orleans in 1429 . The following year she was captured by the Burgundians and sold to the English, and a year later she was burned at the stake for witchcraft at the age of 18 or 19. Her story has captured the imagination of many writers, and she is variously portrayed as a national and political hero, a model of apolitical straightforwardness and honesty, and a religious heroine. She was canonized in 1920 . More recent influences have included the American film actress Joan Crawford ( 1908–77 , born Lucille le Sueur ), the British actress Joan Collins ( b. 1933 ), the American comedienne Joan Rivers ( b. 1933 ), and the West Indian pop singer Joan Armatrading ( b. 1950 ).

Dictionary of First Names © Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges 1990, 2003, 2006.

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